Search Results

Hits 1 to 20 of 708

_id ec4d
authors Croser, J.
year 2001
title GDL Object
source The Architect’s Journal, 14 June 2001, pp. 49-50
summary It is all too common for technology companies to seek a new route to solving the same problem but for the most part the solutions address the effect and not the cause. The good old-fashioned pencil is the perfect example where inventors have sought to design-out the effect of the inherent brittleness of lead. Traditionally different methods of sharpening were suggested and more recently the propelling pencil has reigned king, the lead being supported by the dispensing sleeve thus reducing the likelihood of breakage. Developers convinced by the Single Building Model approach to design development have each embarked on a difficult journey to create an easy to use feature packed application. Unfortunately it seems that the two are not mutually compatible if we are to believe what we see emanating from Technology giants Autodesk in the guise of Architectural Desktop 3. The effect of their development is a feature rich environment but the cost and in this case the cause is a tool which is far from easy to use. However, this is only a small part of a much bigger problem, Interoperability. You see when one designer develops a model with one tool the information is typically locked in that environment. Of course the geometry can be distributed and shared amongst the team for use with their tools but the properties, or as often misquoted, the intelligence is lost along the way. The effect is the technological version of rubble; the cause is the low quality of data-translation available to us. Fortunately there is one company, which is making rapid advancements on the whole issue of collaboration, and data sharing. An old timer (Graphisoft - famous for ArchiCAD) has just donned a smart new suit, set up a new company called GDL Technology and stepped into the ring to do battle, with a difference. The difference is that GDL Technology does not rely on conquering the competition, quite the opposite in fact their success relies upon the continued success of all the major CAD platforms including AutoCAD, MicroStation and ArchiCAD (of course). GDL Technology have created a standard data format for manufacturers called GDL Objects. Product manufacturers such as Velux are now able to develop product libraries using GDL Objects, which can then be placed in a CAD model, or drawing using almost any CAD tool. The product libraries can be stored on the web or on CD giving easy download access to any building industry professional. These objects are created using scripts which makes them tiny for downloading from the web. Each object contains 3 important types of information: · Parametric scale dependant 2d plan symbols · Full 3d geometric data · Manufacturers information such as material, colour and price Whilst manufacturers are racing to GDL Technologies door to sign up, developers and clients are quick to see the benefit too. Porsche are using GDL Objects to manage their brand identity as they build over 300 new showrooms worldwide. Having defined the building style and interior Porsche, in conjunction with the product suppliers, have produced a CD-ROM with all of the selected building components such as cladding, doors, furniture, and finishes. Designing and detailing the various schemes will therefore be as straightforward as using Lego. To ease the process of accessing, sizing and placing the product libraries GDL Technology have developed a product called GDL Object Explorer, a free-standing application which can be placed on the CD with the product libraries. Furthermore, whilst the Object Explorer gives access to the GDL Objects it also enables the user to save the object in one of many file formats including DWG, DGN, DXF, 3DS and even the IAI's IFC. However, if you are an AutoCAD user there is another tool, which has been designed especially for you, it is called the Object Adapter and it works inside of AutoCAD 14 and 2000. The Object Adapter will dynamically convert all GDL Objects to AutoCAD Blocks during placement, which means that they can be controlled with standard AutoCAD commands. Furthermore, each object can be linked to an online document from the manufacturer web site, which is ideal for more extensive product information. Other tools, which have been developed to make the most of the objects, are the Web Plug-in and SalesCAD. The Plug-in enables objects to be dynamically modified and displayed on web pages and Sales CAD is an easy to learn and use design tool for sales teams to explore, develop and cost designs on a Notebook PC whilst sitting in the architects office. All sales quotations are directly extracted from the model and presented in HTML format as a mixture of product images, product descriptions and tables identifying quantities and costs. With full lifecycle information stored in each GDL Object it is no surprise that GDL Technology see their objects as the future for building design. Indeed they are not alone, the IAI have already said that they are going to explore the possibility of associating GDL Objects with their own data sharing format the IFC. So down to the dirty stuff, money and how much it costs? Well, at the risk of sounding like a market trader in Petticoat Lane, "To you guv? Nuffin". That's right as a user of this technology it will cost you nothing! Not a penny, it is gratis, free. The product manufacturer pays for the license to host their libraries on the web or on CD and even then their costs are small costing from as little as 50p for each CD filled with objects. GDL Technology has come up trumps with their GDL Objects. They have developed a new way to solve old problems. If CAD were a pencil then GDL Objects would be ballistic lead, which would never break or loose its point. A much better alternative to the strategy used by many of their competitors who seek to avoid breaking the pencil by persuading the artist not to press down so hard. If you are still reading and you have not already dropped the magazine and run off to find out if your favorite product supplier has already signed up then I suggest you check out the following web sites www.gdlcentral.com and www.gdltechnology.com. If you do not see them there, pick up the phone and ask them why.
series journal paper
email joec@adrem-dcx.com
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id f7d8
authors Terzidis, Kostas
year 2001
title Teaching Sensor and Internet Technologies for Responsive Building Designs
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 356-362
summary This paper describes a research framework for the use of sensor and Internet technologies in design, monitoring, and control of building systems. Specifically, a course for architecture students that makes use of this research was designed and taught. A prototype system was implemented using sensors and micro servers that collect and forward the data to centralized web-accessible database tables. Students proposed and implemented various projects for responsive building designs by extending or modifying the prototype system.
keywords Sensors, Smart Homes, Remote Control
series ACADIA
email kostas@ucla.edu
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id avocaad_2001_10
id avocaad_2001_10
authors Bige Tunçer, Rudi Stouffs, Sevil Sariyildiz
year 2001
title Facilitating the complexity of architectural analyses
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary It is common practice for architecture students to collect documents on prominent buildings relevant to their design task in the early stage of design. While practitioners can rely on a body of design experience of their own, during the process of a new design, students can only draw from the examples of success and failure from other architects. In the past, such precedent based learning was implicit in the master-apprentice relationship common in the educational system. Nowadays academics commonly no longer have the possibility to maintain an extensive design practice, and instead introduce important outside precedents to the students. Thus, the study of important historical precedents or designs plays an important role in design instruction and in the students’ design processes. While there is no doubt that the most effective outcome of such a study would be achieved when the student does entire the study herself, students also benefit from a collaboration with peers, where they form groups to do an analysis of various aspects of a same building or over a group of buildings. By integrating the respective results into a common, extensible, library, students can draw upon other results for comparisons and relationships between different aspects or buildings. The complexity this introduces is best supported in a computer medium.The Web offers many examples of architectural analyses on a wide variety of subjects. Commonly, these analyses consist of a collection of documents, categorized and hyperlinked to support navigation through the information space. More sophisticated examples rely on a database for storage and management of the data, and offer a more complex categorization of the information entities and their relationships. These studies present effective ways of accessing and browsing information, however, it is precluded within these analyses to distinguish and relate different components within the project documents. If enabled, instead, this would offer a richer information structure presenting new ways of accessing, viewing, and interpreting this information. Hereto, documents can be decomposed by content. This implies both expanding the document structure, replacing document entities by detailed substructures, and augmenting the structure’s relatedness with content information. The relationships between the resulting components make the documents inherently related by content.We propose a methodology to integrate project documents into a single model, and present an application for the presentation of architectural analyses in an educational setting. This approach provides the students with a simple interface and mechanisms for the presentation of an analysis of design precedents, and possibly their own designs. Since all the information is integrated within a single environment, students will benefit from each others’ studies, and can draw new conclusions across analyses and presentations from their peers.
series AVOCAAD
email b.tuncer@bk.tudelft.nl, I.s.sariyildiz@bk.tudelft.nl, r.stouffs@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 0277
authors Brusilovsky, P.
year 2001
title Adaptive hypermedia
source User modelling and User-Adapted Interaction, volume 11, pp. 87-110, Kluwer
summary Hypertext/hypermedia systems and user-model-based adaptive systems in the areas of learning and information retrieval have for a long time been considered as two mutually exclusive approaches to information access. Adaptive systems tailor information to the user and may guide the user in the information space to present the most relevant material, taking into account a model of the user's goals, interests and preferences. Hypermedia systems, on the other hand, are `user neutral': they provide the user with the tools and the freedom to explore an information space by browsing through a complex network of information nodes. Adaptive hypertext and hypermedia systems attempt to bridge the gap between these two approaches. Adaptation of hypermedia systems to each individual user is increasingly needed. With the growing size, complexity and heterogeneity of current hypermedia systems, such as the World Wide Web, it becomes virtually impossible to impose guidelines on authors concerning the overall organization of hypermedia information. The networks therefore become so complex and unstructured that the existing navigational tools are no longer powerful enough to provide orientation on where to search for the needed information. It is also not possible to identify appropriate pre-defined paths or subnets for users with certain goals and knowledge backgrounds since the user community of hypermedia systems is usually quite inhomogeneous. This is particularly true for Web-based applications which are expected to be used by a much greater variety of users than any earlier standalone application. A possible remedy for the negative effects of the traditional `one-size-fits-all' approach in the development of hypermedia systems is to equip them with the ability to adapt to the needs of their individual users. A possible way of achieving adaptivity is by modeling the users and tailoring the system's interactions to their goals, tasks and interests. In this sense, the notion of adaptive hypertext/hypermedia comes naturally to denote a hypertext or hypermedia system which reflects some features of the user and/or characteristics of his system usage in a user model, and utilizes this model in order to adapt various behavioral aspects of the system to the user. This book is the first comprehensive publication on adaptive hypertext and hypermedia. It is oriented towards researchers and practitioners in the fields of hypertext and hypermedia, information systems, andpersonalized systems. It is also an important resource for the numerous developers of Web-based applications. The design decisions, adaptation methods, and experience presented in this book are a unique source of ideas and techniques for developing more usable and more intelligent Web-based systems suitable for a great variety of users. The practitioners will find it important that many of the adaptation techniques presented in this book have proved to be efficient and are ready to be used in various applications.
series other
email peterb@mail.sis.pitt.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 6756
authors Butler, K.S., Rincón, H., Maria Lane, K. and Brand, R.
year 2001
title Construyendo una ciudad sostenible en la frontera: planificación de la ciudad de Colombia, Nuevo León, México [Constructing A Sustainable City In the Border: Planning of the City of Colombia, Nuevo León, Mexico ]
source 2da Conferencia Venezolana sobre Aplicación de Computadores en Arquitectura, Maracaibo (Venezuela) december 2001, pp. 194-203
summary The policy rationale for promotion of urban development in the Mexico-Texas borderland of Nuevo León is likely to be sustained and even strengthened. The University of Texasí participation in new town planning for Colombia spans at least three hierarchical levels with students, faculty members, practitioners and government officials joining efforts. At the ìstudio levelî, students completed a comprehensive landscape assessment for portions of the future city using GPS surveying and GIS database and modeling. Graduate students, using field data, updated 2000 maps/shapefiles, and spatial modeling as an analysis tool, created a series of spatial models to produce useful information about the study areaís inherent suitability for agriculture, human settlement and preservation. This work culminated in a research symposium, planning charrette, refinement of land use and infrastructure assumptions, and the development of masterplan elements for the future city. In contrast to the professional firm, the project provides unique opportunities for intensive learning and applied research that contribute to the ecological, social and economic well-being of new cities and developing regions,
keywords USA-Mexico Border; Sustainable Development; Regional Planning; Arch View
series other
email k.butler@mail.utexas.edu, rinconhr@mail.utexas.edu, maria@lane.web, rbrand@mail.utexas.edu
last changed 2003/02/14 07:29

_id 92cf
authors Cheng, Nancy Yen-wen
year 2001
title Capturing Place: A Comparison of Site Recording Methods
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 243-255
summary When designers document locations for site-specific projects, how do tools affect recording of visual data? We observed design students visiting future project locations with sketchbooks, cameras and video and analysed the resulting Web-based field reports by tallying images according to scale and content. The study describes how tools shape place-recording phases and explains how field reports can contribute to understanding the tools. Examining reports from different classes exposed the importance of objectives and setting characteristics in shaping data collection. A refined approach for studying new place-recording tools is suggested.
keywords Fieldwork In Architectural Practice, Design Process, Computer Media
series CAAD Futures
email nywc@darkwing.uoregon.edu
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 5d15
authors Clayton, M.J., Song, Y., Han, K., Darapureddy, K., Al-Kahaweh, H. and Soh, I.
year 2001
title Data for Reflection: Monitoring the Use of Web-Based Design Aids
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 142-152
summary Web technology provides a new way of generating information about design processes. By monitoring student use of Web-based design aids, it is possible to collect empirical, quantitative evidence regarding the time and sequence of activities in design. The research team has undertaken several software development projects to explore these concepts. In one project, students can use a Web browser running alongside CAD software to access a cost database and evaluate their designs. In a second project, students use a browser to record their time expenditures. They can better document, plan and predict their time needs for a project and better manage their efforts. In a third project, students record the rationale supporting their design decisions. The information is stored in databases and HTML files and is hyperlinked into the CAD software. Each tool provides facilities to record key information about transactions. Interactions are documented with student identification, time of activity, and kind of activity. The databases of empirical information tracking student activity are a unique substantiation of design process that can feed back into teaching and the creation of ever better design tools.
keywords Design Methods, Empirical, Web, Cost Estimating, Time Management
series ACADIA
email mark-clayton@tamu.edu
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id f01c
authors Cuberos Mejía, R., Caldera de Ugarte, N., Indriago, J.A., Camacaro, L., Molina, N. and Cestary, J.
year 2001
title PLANIFICACIÓN TURÍSTICA Y TELEINFORMACIÓN (Planning in the Tourist Industry and Tele-information)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 311-314
summary This paper explains an object-based geographic information system (GIS) developed for tourism planning on Maracaibo, Venezuela. In order to establish a better way to manipulate georeferenced data, this system is migrating its structure from a fouryears- old relational database, incorporating distributed storage on a comprehensive catalog. A combination of operating system, SQL server and Map server, is being implemented to substitute a static web site for a real-time application to easily manipulate maps through a web browser. This work not only creates answers to implementing urban information systems, also it will facilitate their incorporation on collaborative geographical networks in the entire world.
series SIGRADI
email rcuberos@luz.ve
last changed 2016/03/10 08:49

_id 448f
authors De Vecchi, A., Colajanni, S., Corrao, R. and Marano, L.
year 2001
title M.I.C.R.A. - A WBI System to Manage Information for the Recovery of Ancient Buildings
source Architectural Information Management [19th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-8-1] Helsinki (Finland) 29-31 August 2001, pp. 61-66
summary In the field of Architecture and Building Construction is increasing the tendency to search information in the old construction handbooks to find more easily the best solutions to the recovery of ancient buildings: to make them easily accessible we are developing an “electronic handbook” by using the technologies related to Internet. The paper reports on M.I.C.R.A. (Manuale Informatizzato per la Codifica della Regola d’Arte), a WBI System able to allow different kind of users (from experts in the fields of Architecture and Building Construction to university students) to easily find the information stored in the old construction handbooks -edited since the 18th century and normally stored in different libraries around Europe- and to immediately compare them each other. The system information management and the data structuring are explained by describing the design strategies and the specific “research criteria” we have adopted to the development of the system.
keywords Web Knowledge Repository, Didactic Strategies, Information Accessibility, Information Management, Data Structuring
series eCAADe
last changed 2001/08/06 20:38

_id diss_duarte
id diss_duarte
authors Duarte, J. P.
year 2001
title Customizing mass housing: a discursive grammar for Siza’s Malagueira houses
source PhD dissertation, Department of Architecture, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Mass
summary This thesis proposes a process of providing mass-customized housing based on computer-aided design and production systems. It focuses on the design part, which mainly consists of an interactive system for the generation of design solutions based on a mathematical model called discursive grammar. A discursive grammar includes a shape grammar, a description grammar, and a set of heuristics. The shape grammar provides the rules of formal composition, whereas the description grammar describes the design from other relevant viewpoints. The set of heuristics is used to guide the generation of designs by comparing the description of the evolving design with the description of the desired house. The generation of a design proceeds first by producing a design brief from the user-prompted requirements and then by finding a solution that satisfies this brief. Search is largely deterministic, which decreases the amount of time required to find a solution, thereby making it reasonable to develop Web-based implementations. The proposed model enables an enduring designer's dream, that of the mass customization of housing. The model is illustrated with a case study that includes a shape grammar developed for the houses designed by the architect Alvaro Siza at Malagueira, a description grammar based on the Portuguese housing regulations, and a set of heuristics inferred after a set of experiments. In these experiments, designers were asked to generate houses based on the Malagueira grammar for specific clients. It is argued that this discursive grammar provides a rigorous method for understanding and teaching Siza's design process and that similar grammars could be developed for other styles. A Web page for explaining the grammar and generating new designs on-line was developed as a prototype.
series thesis:PhD
email jduarte@civil.ist.utl.pt
last changed 2005/09/09 10:58

_id 96ec
authors Krawczyk, Robert J.
year 2001
title The Art of Spirolaterals
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 408-409
summary The web site includes a series of images which is part of a larger set investigating the formation of two-dimensional designs leading to three-dimensional architectural forms using basic mathematical concepts. While investigating fractals and space curves, a mathematical figure called a "spirolateral" was encountered. A spirolateral is based on a square spiral with increasing length of turns and the turns repeating themselves. The turns can be all in one direction or certain turns can go the opposite direction. Angles other than 90 degrees can be used. The most interesting of these are ones that close on themselves, not all do. Investigating a series of possible turning angles, number of turns, number of repeats, and trying all revered turns, I identified over 10,000 spirolaterals that closed. This web site displays over 300 such spirolateral designs. In addition to investigating spirolaterals composed of straight lines, a series was developed that curves them. These designs are based on spirolaterals that are curved by antiMercator, circular, and inversion transformations. Figure 1 displays the 460 spirolateral, 4 turns at 60 degrees. Figure 2 and 3 display the same spirolateral with the antiMercator and Circular transformations applied. This web site includes galleries displaying the great variety of spirolaterals, interactive JAVA routines to display a series of spirolaterals, as well as, developing your own design, a technical description of spirolaterals, and the data for all the displayed images. My overall interest is to investigate methods that can develop forms that are in one sense predictable, but have the strong element to generate the unexpected. Using custom software enables an approach that allows variations to be investigated in a repeatable way, this enabling me to fine tune an idea by repetition and experimentation.
series ACADIA
email krawczyk@iit.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id 7655
authors Okeil, Ahmad and El Araby, Mostafa
year 2003
title Realism vs. Reality in Digital Reconstruction of Cities
source CORP 2003, Vienna University of Technology, 25.2.-28.2.2003 [Proceedings on CD-Rom]
summary The digital reconstruction of existing cities using virtual reality techniques is being increasingly used. For consultants, municipalities and planning departments these models provide decision support through visual simulations (El Araby, 2001). For academia they provide a new tool for teaching students urban design and planning (Okeil, 2001). For authorities they provide a tool for promoting the city on the world wide web trying to attract more businesses and tourists to it. The built environment is very rich in detail. It does not only consist of open spaces surrounded by abstract buildings but it also includes many smaller objects such as street furniture, traffic signs, street lights, different types of vegetation and shop signs for example. All surfaces in the built environment have unique properties describing color, texture and opacity. The built environmentis dynamic and our perception is affected by factors such as pedestrian movement, traffic, environmental factors such as wind, noise and shadows. The built environment is also shaped by the accumulation of changes caused by many influences through time. All these factors make the reconstruction of the built environment a very complex task. This paper tries to answer the question: how realistic the reconstructed models of urban areas can be. It sees “Realism“ as a variable floating between three types of realties. The reality of the physical environment which we are trying to represent. The reality of the digital environment which will host the digitally reconstructed city. And the reality of the working environment which deals with the problem of limitation of resources needed to digitally reconstruct the city. A case study of building a 3D computer model of an urban area in the United Arab Emirates demonstrates that new time-saving techniques for data acquisition can enhance realism by meetingbudget limitations and time limitations.
keywords Virtual Reality; Photo Realism; Texture Maps; 3D Modeling; Urban Design
series other
email a.okeil@uaeu.ac.ae
last changed 2003/03/11 19:39

_id ba73
authors Oliván, Alfredo Serreta and Sebastián, Ricardo Aliod
year 2001
title GESTARCAD, UNA APLICACIÓN PARA EL DISEÑO Y SIMULACIÓN DE REDES DE FLUIDOS, PROGRAMADA BAJO EL ENTORNO AUTOCAD UTILIZANDO OBJETOS ACTIVE X EN VB 6.0 (GESTARCAD, An Application for the Design and Simulation of Networks of Fluids, Programmed in the Autocad Environment Using Active Objects X in 6,0 Vb)
source SIGraDi biobio2001 - [Proceedings of the 5th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics / ISBN 956-7813-12-4] Concepcion (Chile) 21-23 november 2001, pp. 54-56
summary In this paper, the programming methodology and the results obtained in the development of the GestarCAD simulation application as web as flow net design are presented. As a graphic interface AutoCAD is used, programming the application in Visual Basic 6.0 and using the objects Active X implemented by the latest versions of AutoCAD. In this way, both data input and plotting of results can be carried out from an AutoCAD environment.
series SIGRADI
email serreta@posta.unizar.es
last changed 2016/03/10 08:56

_id 17cb
authors Pena-Mora, F. and Mills, J.W.
year 2001
title Component-based architecture for online collaborative disaster relief mission planning environments
source CIDAC, Volume 3 Issue 2 May 2001
summary International disaster relief mission planning situations involve geographically dispersed participants working in a stressful environment towards a common goal. When a large-scale disaster occurs, issues such as search and rescue, survivor relocation and infrastructure rebuilding need to be addressed in a short amount of time. Several constraints exist in this environment such as cultural differences among the relief agencies and the need for flexibility to handle changes in the situation. These constraints lead ot the need for a complex collaboration system which includes support for meeting protocol enforcement, session logging, multiple device access and reliability during periods of highly unstable network conditions.   A component based collaboration infrastructure to support multi-device web-based collaboration sessions has been designed to address such requirements. The system components include a data repository, a collaboration manager and an information policy enforcer to address such constraints. The system can support communcation applications like simulation systems, GIS mapping and resouce management. To support such a wide range of applications and provide access to their data from various hardware devices, the design of the system developed in this research effort is applicatin and configuration neutral for greatest flexibility and applicability.
keywords Internet Collaboration; Architecture; Mission; Planning
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 18:39

_id ec42
authors Rosenman, Mike and Wang, Fujun
year 2001
title A component agent based open CAD system for collaborative design
source Automation in Construction 10 (4) (2001) pp. 383-397
summary The competitive market requires rapid product development. Virtual product development is a new development mode in this network times. It is featured by its dynamic development alliance, i.e., those partners are distributed in the world. This paper presents an open-system architecture for a collaborative CAD system supporting virtual product development. The software component technology is adopted to build the system. A component is a reusable application whose data and methods are exposed, and can be accessed and operated by other applications. In this system, each building element or assembly is designed as an independent component. The component agent (CA) method is used as the basic system modules. To manage these distributed CAs, a web-based interface manager is provided. The assembly shop is a product design space based on those CAs and the interface manager. To manage the collaborative session, a web-based design session manager is proposed. This paper describes such a system architecture.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id 6a02
id 6a02
authors Tan, Beng-Kiang
year 2001
title Visualizing Building Occupancy Pattern on Campus
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 398-404
summary This paper addresses the problem of information opacity that planners and university administrators have when they have multiple sets of data that are not interconnected and how these data can be visualized. The visualization of building occupancy pattern on campus is used as an example to illustrate how this general problem can be addressed through a database driven effective visualization that supports decision-making. This paper proposes a solution using web-based 3D Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) animation dynamically generated from a database and describes a prototype in progress. The prototype displays a broad overview of building occupancy patterns across campus through 3D animation of occupancy over time. From the overview, users can navigate further to find out the details of occupancy throughout the day for specific buildings on campus.
keywords Visualization, VRML, Animation, Campus Population, Information Visualization
series ACADIA
email akitanbk@nus.edu.sg
last changed 2003/10/13 04:32

_id 7318
authors Tunçer, B., Stouffs, R. and Sariyildiz, S.
year 2001
title Integrating Architectural Abstractions
source Reinventing the Discourse - How Digital Tools Help Bridge and Transform Research, Education and Practice in Architecture [Proceedings of the Twenty First Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-10-1] Buffalo (New York) 11-14 October 2001, pp. 110-121
summary Building projects are communicated through project documents. A collection of these documents are stored, related, and managed within digital environments for various purposes. These environments are all concerned with the complexity of organizing an information space: how to organize the information and to relate the individual entities within this organization in order to support effective searching and browsing of the resulting information structure. We present a methodology to handle this complexity through integrating a number of design documents of different formats within a single information structure. When this integrated structure is highly intra-related, it provides support for effective searching and browsing of this information. To achieve such intra-relatedness, we consider a notion of types from architecture as a semantic structure for project document management in the AEC industry. We discuss specific techniques to support this use of types with respect to EDMS’s and Web-based project management systems. We describe a prototype application, a presentation tool for architectural analyses, which combines these techniques.
keywords Complexity, Information Structure, Architectural Analysis, Flexibility, Effectiveness
series ACADIA
email b.tuncer@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2002/04/25 17:30

_id 8d50
authors Turk, Z., Cerovsek, T. and Martens, B.
year 2001
title The Topics of CAAD. A Machine's Perspective
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 547-560
summary Ontology of a scientific field typically includes a taxonomy that breaks up the field into several topics. The break-up is present in the organisation of information in books, libraries and on the Web. An on-line database of papers related to CAAD called CUMINCAD was created and it includes over 3000 papers with abstracts. They are available through the search interface - one knows an author or a keyword and can find the papers where such keyword or author's name appears. Alternative interface would be through browsing papers topic by topic. The papers, however, are not categorised. In this paper, we present the efforts to use the machine learning and data mining techniques to automatically group the papers into clusters and create a set of keywords that would label a cluster. The hypothesis was that an algorithm would create clusters of papers automatically and that the clusters would be similar to the groupings a human would have made. We investigated several algorithms for doing an analysis like that but were unable to prove the original hypothesis. We conclude that it requires more than objective statistical analysis of the words in abstracts to create an ontology of CAAD.
keywords CAAD, Machine Learning, Clustering, Pattern Recognition
series CAAD Futures
email ziga.turk@fagg.uni-lj.si
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 70cc
authors Witten, I.H. and Frank, E.
year 2000
title Data Mining - Practical Machine Learning Tools and Techniques with JAVA Implementations
source Morgan Kaufmann
summary Witten and Frank's textbook was one of two books that I used for a data mining class in the Fall of 2001. The book covers all major methods of data mining that produce a knowledge representation as output. Knowledge representation is hereby understood as a representation that can be studied, understood, and interpreted by human beings, at least in principle. Thus, neural networks and genetic algorithms are excluded from the topics of this textbook. We need to say "can be understood in principle" because a large decision tree or a large rule set may be as hard to interpret as a neural network. The book first develops the basic machine learning and data mining methods. These include decision trees, classification and association rules, support vector machines, instance-based learning, Naive Bayes classifiers, clustering, and numeric prediction based on linear regression, regression trees, and model trees. It then goes deeper into evaluation and implementation issues. Next it moves on to deeper coverage of issues such as attribute selection, discretization, data cleansing, and combinations of multiple models (bagging, boosting, and stacking). The final chapter deals with advanced topics such as visual machine learning, text mining, and Web mining.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 3e6a
authors Wittkopf, Stephen
year 2001
title I-Light, a webbased learning system for architectural lighting design
source TU Darmstadt
summary With the rising meaning of architectural lighting also the requirement at appropriate light planning rises. The possibilities of digital instruments were realized by several lamp manufacturers, which use 3D-CAD to present visualizations and use the Internet for their distribution. However in the field of universities it is important to offer instruments and methods with which the interaction of light and architecture can be learned descriptive, comprehensibly and interactively. Introductory in a theoretical section the bases of light planning and learn-educational concepts are pointed out. Parallel the state of the art in the areas of computer-aided learning and the light simulation is presented and evaluated regarding the learn-educational suitability. Thereupon an action requirement is formulated, which designates a new integration of the individual areas. It flows into the development of an interactive Web-based training system for the design with light - I-Light - whose concept and implementation in the following sections is described. In an application of examples the author points out finally, how this innovative connection of the Internet, 3D-CAD and simulation supports a better understanding of the medium light in the architecture perception. A new virtual light laboratory forms the core of this training system, in which architectural planning examples can be represented three-dimensional and changed interactively. A developed semantic scene model ensures for the fact that lighting, materials and delimitation surfaces are varied didactically appropriately and compared, so that visual effects and important interrelation can be assumed and checked. The author orients itself at the methodology by simulation and merges 3D-CAD and light simulation programs into the training system. The calculated photo-realistic picture is regarded not - as otherwise usual - as presentation material, but as interactive tools. Since 3D-CAD and light simulation programs presuppose much application knowledge, the author does not pursue to confront the user with these complex programs. He developed a new system with a Web-based graphic surface, that enables 3D-scenes to be loaded, be changed and stored easily (front-end). Furthermore it enables the remote control to an automatic, photo-realistic simulation on push of a button on an external high end render machine, that is connected via Internet, where at least all files are externally stored. For the operation of the front-end is only an average PC with a standard Webbrowser necessary. For the receiving station the author develops a new interface, which extends a standard Web server by the new possibility of storing and executing lighting simulations (back-end). The system presented by the author differs in the didactical concept and in the technical implementation from the solutions existing so far in similar areas. The interactive virtual light laboratories of the architectural planning examples represent a new beginning of Web-based learning environments. To the selected tools (HTML, Java, VRML, Web server, Lightscape) there yet exist no matured alternatives.
series thesis:PhD
email akiskw@nus.edu.sg
more http://elib.tu-darmstadt.de/diss/000131/
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

For more results click below:

this is page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3show page 4show page 5... show page 35