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_id ecaade03_369_112_akgun
id ecaade03_369_112_akgun
authors Akgun, Yenal
year 2003
title An Interactive Database (HizmO) for Reconstructing Lost Modernist Izmir:
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 369-372
summary The research project in progress in the School of Architecture at the Izmir Institute of Technology includes documentation and reconstruction (by 3D modeling in electronic media) of damaged and lost early modern buildings in the Izmir region. The research aims to analyze the differences between Izmir modern buildings and Universal Modern Style, and preserve information on architectural heritage for future generations. The project is at the phase of developing an interactive web-based historical database (HizmO) that includes data (information, images, technical drawings, VRML models) and visualization of the findings. This database aims to be a pioneer in Mediterranean Region for exhibition of relations between traditional architecture (especially Mediterranean locality) and modernism, and organization of a network and off-campus learning activity for Mediterranean architecture that serve as a guide for students, researchers and architects. This paper aims at introducing this research and discussing the application of the database “HizmO,” its aims and potential effects on education in architectural history.
keywords E-learning, educational database, architectural history, VRML
series eCAADe
email yenalakgun@iyte.edu.tr
last changed 2003/11/22 08:50

_id sigradi2003_096
id sigradi2003_096
authors Alvarez, Valeria and Albero, Constanza
year 2003
title Una rama en la arquitectura de la era digital (A branch in architecture of the digital age)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary Genetic information determines the germ of life, the first idea, that encloses all the power of creation. In every "germ" lays the identity, the strength to seek and fulfill expression in form. History, technical and scientific progress require new answers and provide new tools while encouraging investigation. A "Branch", a simple nature element, is reinterpreted into bits of information, reconstructed after being apprehended. This process reveals new elements that could have never been conceived with traditional methods. Nature and Technology complement each other in an embriological growing system that provides a new concept in the construction of real spaces.
series SIGRADI
email valvarez@farq.unr.edu.ar;
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ijac20031201
id ijac20031201
authors Camarata, Ken; Gross, Mark D.; Yi-Luen Do, Ellen
year 2003
title A Physical Computing Studio: Exploring Computational Artifacts and Environments
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 2
summary This paper describes a studio that explores interfaces for computationally enhanced artifacts and environments. The studio is designed as a traditional architectural design studio, fostering creative thinking and encouraging hands-on learning. It brings students from art, music, architecture, computer science, and engineering together into teams to design and build physical computing projects.The team's unusual mix of knowledge and experience allows for creative solutions. As a result, the studio has become a test bed for new and interesting ideas.
series journal
email mdgross@u.washington.edu
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id acadia03_017
id acadia03_017
authors Cheng, Nancy Yen-wen
year 2003
title Digital Curricula: Effective Integration Of Digital Courses - A Delicate Balance
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 129-130
summary One of the challenges faced by digital design teachers is how to fit our piece into the larger puzzle of architectural education. How can we make computing support architecture’s varied endeavors and thinking modes? Students must be able to explore and communicate design ideas fluidly using digital or traditional media, as suitable to specific queries. We need to expose students to a palette of current and emerging techniques and help them develop a personal set of media skills.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email nywc@uoregon.edu
last changed 2007/10/22 04:59

_id caadria2006_597
id caadria2006_597
authors CHOR-KHENG LIM, CHING-SHUN TANG, WEI-YEN HSAO, JUNE-HAO HOU, YU-TUNG LIU
year 2006
title NEW MEDIA IN DIGITAL DESIGN PROCESS: Towards a standardize procedure of CAD/CAM fabrication
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 597-599
summary In 1990, due to the traditional architecture design and construction method difficult to build the complicated and non-geometry free-form Fish Structure in Barcelona, architect Frank Gehry started learn from the field of aerospace to utilize CAD/CAM technology in design and manufacture process. He created the free-form fish model in CAD system and exported the digital CAD model data to CAM machine (RP and CNC) to fabricate the design components, and finally assembled on the site. Gehry pioneered in the new digital design process in using CAD/CAM technology or so-called digital fabrication. It becomes an important issue recently as the CAD/CAM technology progressively act as the new digital design media in architectural design and construction process (Ryder et al., 2002; Kolarevic, 2003). Furthermore, in the field of architecture professional, some commercial computer systems had been developed on purpose of standardizes the digital design process in using CAD/CAM fabrication such as Gehry Technologies formed by Gehry Partners; SmartGeometry Group in Europe and Objectile proposed by Bernard Cache. Researchers in the research field like Mark Burry, Larry Sass, Branko Kolarevic, Schodek and others are enthusiastic about the exploration of the role of CAD/CAM fabrication as new design media in design process (Burry, 2002; Schodek et al., 2005; Lee, 2005).
series CAADRIA
email kheng@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id sigradi2003_090
id sigradi2003_090
authors Espina, Jane
year 2003
title Ciudades Tradicionales Vs. Ciudades Digitales (Traditional Cities Vs Digital Cities)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary This work presents the creation of a Documentary City which has 3D models of buildings and actualized urban spaces, related to a systematic information and hypermediatical, through the use of a Data Base as a digital tool for the construction of a Data Bank, which will be part of the Digital City of Maracaibo and it could be requested on a physical approach or distance way using digital technologies. The virtual reconstruction and documented part of the history of the city and the records of buildings in different historical growing moments of Maracaibo City, since its foundation until now, will permit recover part of the lost memories of the city. This research will constitute a unpublished experience in Venezuela and belong to the Hypermediatical Model of Maracaibo City of the Institute of Architectonical Research of the Faculty of Architecture and Design in the Universidad del Zulia.
keywords Data base, tridimensional models, multimedia, digital city, urban spaces.
series SIGRADI
email jacky@convergence.com.ve
last changed 2016/03/10 08:51

_id diss_2003
id diss_2003
authors Gorczyca, Adam
year 2003
title Interaction of the design methods and the contemporary computer techniques
source Faculty of Architecture, Warsaw University of Technology
summary The thesis researches a bilateral relations between computer techniques and methods of architectural design. It represents a holistic attitude because of a multithread analysis in the field of the theory of design, a new hard- and software used by architects, and a design practice.

Thesis: Contemporary computer science development at the end of the twentieth century pushed architects to use hard- and software as tools, which became an active support (more than just CAAD). It enabled to widen the scope of a form-properties research and a generation of solutions impossible to achieve before, by using traditional methods and tools. This situation leads to new, unpredictable possibilities of architectural research and design. Objectives: 1. Definition of the latest trends in computer technologies applied in architectural offices. 2. Presentation of some practical consequencies of application of those technologies in design and construction. 3. Separation of new design methods caused by use of digital tools. 4. A simplified taxonomy of the methods above, with characteristic features. 5. A research in practical application of digital tools in Polish and foreign offices, as well as at the WUT Faculty of Architecture.

The subject of the work:

The thesis constitutes of five chapters. The first chapter is an introduction, where the range of work is presented in the context of place, time and the research made. The following chapters research three aspects of CAAD: (1) hardware and software, (2) new definition of architecture, which is a result of application of the digital tools, (3) practical problems connected with the use of computer techniques. The second chapter describes the new technologies in use –Virtual Reality (incl. VRD, CAVE’s, Data Gloves, motion-capture), Rapid prototyping (incl. holographic printers, 3D scanners, routers, milling-machines), new types of interfaces (e.g. xWorlds, InfoSpace, Flock of birds), etc. The third chapter is a theoretical one. It presents three types of changes in design methods, which can be classified, judging by results, in architecture of: (a) in-formation (b) de-formation and (c) cyberspace. All the mentioned applications of a digital technology cause redefinition of the range of the architects’ profession. The fourth chapter is concentrated on the application and utilization of technology. It is a detailed analysis of chosen buildings (characteristic examples) and design methods used by some avant-garde and well-known practitioners and visioners of architecture (Eisenman, Gehry, Spuybroek, etc.). It also presents statistics, where the influence of digital tools on the way of working (efficiency, productivity, use of tools) is expressed numerically. A synthesis summarizes the relation between architects and the new digital tools in some aspects: hard- and software, social changes, ergonomics, methodics, linguistic/symbolic and architectural. The mentioned ranges of interaction constitute the proof of the thesis.

series thesis:PhD
email adamgorczyca@interia.pl
last changed 2003/09/17 16:20

_id acadia03_057
id acadia03_057
authors Greinacher, Udo (et al.)
year 2003
title URBAN FURNITURE: from gazebo to digi-booth
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, p. 429
summary Recent years have seen the steady increase of automated kiosks and temporary structures that begin to replace traditional building types. In this course we studied and analyzed the development of the gazebo/kiosk in urban/rural settings both inside and outside over time, assessed its value for commerce and social equity, proposed a forward projection regarding the role digital info-booths/commercial kiosks will play in our urban environment, and developed new spatial models that can become an integral part of our daily experience.
series ACADIA
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id sigradi2006_e028c
id sigradi2006_e028c
authors Griffith, Kenfield; Sass, Larry and Michaud, Dennis
year 2006
title A strategy for complex-curved building design:Design structure with Bi-lateral contouring as integrally connected ribs
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 465-469
summary Shapes in designs created by architects such as Gehry Partners (Shelden, 2002), Foster and Partners, and Kohn Peterson and Fox rely on computational processes for rationalizing complex geometry for building construction. Rationalization is the reduction of a complete geometric shape into discrete components. Unfortunately, for many architects the rationalization is limited reducing solid models to surfaces or data on spread sheets for contractors to follow. Rationalized models produced by the firms listed above do not offer strategies for construction or digital fabrication. For the physical production of CAD description an alternative to the rationalized description is needed. This paper examines the coupling of digital rationalization and digital fabrication with physical mockups (Rich, 1989). Our aim is to explore complex relationships found in early and mid stage design phases when digital fabrication is used to produce design outcomes. Results of our investigation will aid architects and engineers in addressing the complications found in the translation of design models embedded with precision to constructible geometries. We present an algorithmically based approach to design rationalization that supports physical production as well as surface production of desktop models. Our approach is an alternative to conventional rapid prototyping that builds objects by assembly of laterally sliced contours from a solid model. We explored an improved product description for rapid manufacture as bilateral contouring for structure and panelling for strength (Kolarevic, 2003). Infrastructure typically found within aerospace, automotive, and shipbuilding industries, bilateral contouring is an organized matrix of horizontal and vertical interlocking ribs evenly distributed along a surface. These structures are monocoque and semi-monocoque assemblies composed of structural ribs and skinning attached by rivets and adhesives. Alternative, bi-lateral contouring discussed is an interlocking matrix of plywood strips having integral joinery for assembly. Unlike traditional methods of building representations through malleable materials for creating tangible objects (Friedman, 2002), this approach constructs with the implication for building life-size solutions. Three algorithms are presented as examples of rationalized design production with physical results. The first algorithm [Figure 1] deconstructs an initial 2D curved form into ribbed slices to be assembled through integral connections constructed as part of the rib solution. The second algorithm [Figure 2] deconstructs curved forms of greater complexity. The algorithm walks along the surface extracting surface information along horizontal and vertical axes saving surface information resulting in a ribbed structure of slight double curvature. The final algorithm [Figure 3] is expressed as plug-in software for Rhino that deconstructs a design to components for assembly as rib structures. The plug-in also translates geometries to a flatten position for 2D fabrication. The software demonstrates the full scope of the research exploration. Studies published by Dodgson argued that innovation technology (IvT) (Dodgson, Gann, Salter, 2004) helped in solving projects like the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, and the Millennium Bridge in London. Similarly, the method discussed in this paper will aid in solving physical production problems with complex building forms. References Bentley, P.J. (Ed.). Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufman Publishers Inc. San Francisco, CA, 1-73 Celani, G, (2004) “From simple to complex: using AutoCAD to build generative design systems” in: L. Caldas and J. Duarte (org.) Implementations issues in generative design systems. First Intl. Conference on Design Computing and Cognition, July 2004 Dodgson M, Gann D.M., Salter A, (2004), “Impact of Innovation Technology on Engineering Problem Solving: Lessons from High Profile Public Projects,” Industrial Dynamics, Innovation and Development, 2004 Dristas, (2004) “Design Operators.” Thesis. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2004 Friedman, M, (2002), Gehry Talks: Architecture + Practice, Universe Publishing, New York, NY, 2002 Kolarevic, B, (2003), Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing, Spon Press, London, UK, 2003 Opas J, Bochnick H, Tuomi J, (1994), “Manufacturability Analysis as a Part of CAD/CAM Integration”, Intelligent Systems in Design and Manufacturing, 261-292 Rudolph S, Alber R, (2002), “An Evolutionary Approach to the Inverse Problem in Rule-Based Design Representations”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 329-350 Rich M, (1989), Digital Mockup, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Reston, VA, 1989 Schön, D., The Reflective Practitioner: How Professional Think in Action. Basic Books. 1983 Shelden, D, (2003), “Digital Surface Representation and the Constructability of Gehry’s Architecture.” Diss. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2003 Smithers T, Conkie A, Doheny J, Logan B, Millington K, (1989), “Design as Intelligent Behaviour: An AI in Design Thesis Programme”, Artificial Intelligence in Design, 293-334 Smithers T, (2002), “Synthesis in Designing”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 3-24 Stiny, G, (1977), “Ice-ray: a note on the generation of Chinese lattice designs” Environmental and Planning B, volume 4, pp. 89-98
keywords Digital fabrication; bilateral contouring; integral connection; complex-curve
series SIGRADI
email kenfield@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id caadria2003_c5-1
id caadria2003_c5-1
authors Hoon, M. , Jabi, W. and Goldman, G.
year 2003
title Immersion, Interaction, and Collaboration In Architectural Design Using Gaming Engines
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 721-738
summary "This paper investigates the role of gaming engines in the architectural design process through the introduction of features such as immersion, interaction and collaboration. While traditional 3D modelling and visualization systems such as 3D Studio MAX and form?Z offer increasingly convincing visual simulations, gaming engines are approaching the visual realism of such systems and are offering additional interactive features that are usually available only in more expensive immersive virtual reality systems . Additionally, the capability to have multiple individuals inhabit and navigate the space offers unique opportunities for collaboration as well as the investigation of human behaviour. Participants with internet access can be invited to access a shared virtual environment. Collaboration among users can be further enhanced by combining immersive navigation with peer-to-peer instant messaging and/or adding a voice channel. This paper analyzes these issues through research summary and the creation and user testing of a prototype based on a publicly available gaming engine. Through a series of assignments within an academic course, students in the school of architecture were asked to iteratively use and test this prototype for the collaborative exploration of designed environments. Students made their environments available for others to navigate in real-time and offer comments. A final design review was conducted in which critics were asked to enter the designed environment, explore it at will and interact with the student as well as others present in the same virtual space. This paper will illustrate some of the student projects and describe the immersive,"
series CAADRIA
email hoon@njit.edu , jabi@njit.edu
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id acadia03_018
id acadia03_018
authors Kalay, Yehuda E. and Jeong, Yongwook
year 2003
title Collaborative Design Process Simulation Game
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 133-141
summary Collaboration is an important aspect of the architect’s education. However, it is not amenable to the traditional project-based learning pedagogy that works so well for developing form-making skills. Being a process, rather than a product, it cannot be revealed by judging the results alone, which is often how form-making skills are taught and judged. Rather, the process of collaboration is only evident when the number of the participants exceeds a certain threshold, and when actions taken by other participants affect an individual’s on-going design decisions. The advent of on-line, multi-player simulation games provides an analogy and an opportunity to explore interactive collaborative design pedagogies. Their abstract nature helps focus attention on the core issues of the simulated phenomenon, while the playful nature of a game, as opposed to “work,” encourages immersion and role playing that contribute to the learning process. This paper describes an on-line game for simulating the design collaboration process. It espouses to simulate, exercise, and provide a feel for the social dimension of collaboration, by embedding mutual dependencies that encourage players to engage each other—in adversarial or collaborative manners—to accomplish their goals. Specifically, it is intended to help students understand what collaboration is, why it is necessary, and how it is done. The game is modeled after popular board games like Scrabble and Monopoly: players build “houses” made of colored cubes on a site shared with other players. Actions taken by one player immediately affect his/her neighbors. A carefully constructed set of rules awards or deducts points for every action taken by a player and by his/her neighbors. The rules were constructed in such a manner that players who collaborate (in a variety of ways) stand to gain more points than those who do not. The player with the most points “wins.”
series ACADIA
email ywjeong@uclink.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id ijac20031105
id ijac20031105
authors Kieferle, Joachim B.; Herzberger, Erwin
year 2003
title The "Digital year for Architects" - Experiences with an Integrated Teaching Concept
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 1 - no. 1
summary The "digital year for architects" is an integrated course for graduate architecture students that has been running since 1997, at Stuttgart University. Its concept is to link together traditional design teaching and working with computers. Three seminar classes and one design project form the framework of the course. In it the students are taught the design of, for example, image and space composition, typography, video, and using virtual reality. Additionally we cover theoretical basics for the final design project, such as information management or working environments. The course takes in approximately a dozen software packages and ends with a visionary design project. The products have shown the advantage of an integrated course compared to separate courses. The course proves to be more intensive in dealing with the project as well as achieving better skills when learning the associated new digital media. An important feature is that because the project topics are different from conventional architectural schemes, and tend to be more abstract, a key effect is to widen the students' way of thinking about designing.
series journal
email kieferle@architektur.fh-wiesbaden.de
more http://www.multi-science.co.uk/ijac.htm
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id caadria2007_057
id caadria2007_057
authors Kouide, Tahar; G. Paterson
year 2007
title BIM as a Viable Collaborative Working Tool: A Case Study
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary For the majority of design practices in the construction industry the use of CAD systems have been used to merely automate hand drafting (Cohen 2003). This is the traditional way of working that has changed very little since the introduction of commercial CAD systems. These practices as means of communication are being replaced by a virtual building model environment which encapsulates all of the information for an entire construction project and thereby enables computer-supported co-operative working practices. (Newton 2003) This study aims to determine whether Building Information Modelling (BIM) can, and whether it will, replace traditional communication media as the standard in the industry for computersupported co-operative working practices in the Architecture Engineering and construction (AEC) sector. The bulk of the research comprises an extensive literature review looking at the principal reasons behind the development of BIM, the potential advantages and drawbacks of the technology, and the barriers and obstacles which inhibit its adoption as a means of computer-supported co-operative working. The findings of the study have been validated and analysed against current practice in the field through a live case study analysis of the on-going Heathrow airport Terminal 5 Project in London (UK). The Terminal 5 case study demonstrates that present software tools, although usable, still present significant implicit technical constraints to wider implementation among Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs). The case study has also shown that in practice, the success of BIM depends just as much on the working practices and ethos of participants in the project chain as it does on the capabilities of the software itself, in particular the willingness of practitioners to change traditional working practices. The case study has shown that the present investment, in terms of time, cost, and effort required to implementing the technology means that BIM is unlikely to be adopted on small simple projects where conventional CAD is still adequate. It also highlighted that BIM tools currently available are not yet adequately developed to satisfy the requirements of the many procurement and especially contractual arrangements which presently exist and many firms will be frightened off by the unresolved legal issues which may arise from implementing BIM in their practices.
series CAADRIA
email g.j.paterson@rgu.ac.uk
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id acadia03_016
id acadia03_016
authors Luhan, Gregory A.
year 2003
title Digital Curricula: Effective Integration of Digital Courses. Stitched-spaces and Digital Permutations
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 128-129
summary If, “the purpose of art is to awaken reality” as Paul Klee writes, what then, is the generative purpose of the digital as it relates to architecture? By uniting the traditional ways of knowing with the more contemporary and technologically advanced ways of knowing, the architect then would be able to develop the capacity to visualize and to understand unseen spatial relationships and exploit their latent characteristics. The computer consequently allows a direct synthesis to occur between the original idea and its formal application, in a sense providing new questions to old answers.
series ACADIA
email galuhan@uky.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id sigradi2004_151
id sigradi2004_151
authors María Estela Sánchez Cavazos
year 2004
title La gráfica digital dentro del proceso de diseño caso: Talleres de arquitectura de la u.a.a. [Digital Graphics in the Design Process. Case: the U.A.A. Architectural Studio]
source SIGraDi 2004 - [Proceedings of the 8th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Porte Alegre - Brasil 10-12 november 2004
summary This work is developing at the moment, tries to find elements that allow arm to a frame of reference for a doctoral thesis that studies the processes of architectonic design and the transformations that this one within the factories of education with the introduction of the digital representation undergoes. It is a study that it initiates in the 2003 with an applied cuasi-experiment to students of the masters in architecture of the Independent University of Nuevo León (Monterrey, México), (work presented/displayed in the forum SIGraDi 2003). Taking into account the results obtained in that one first work it was decided not to take part and to force the student to work with a specific type of tool (digital or traditional), but to leave them chose the work tool freely, observing his photographic process by means of video-recordings, registries and personal interviews with the purpose of explaining because of his processes. The registries were taken in the Factory from semestral Architectonic Design 5°, of the Independent University of Aguascalientes (Mexico).
series SIGRADI
email mesanche@correo.uaa.mx
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id ecaade03_607_140_mpapavasiliou
id ecaade03_607_140_mpapavasiliou
authors Papavasiliou, Mattheos
year 2003
title Digital space and ephemeral visuals as determinants of contemporary design: A Survey of Projects of Architectural Students in CAAD
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 607-611
summary Outside of views produced deliberately for the design of architecture, there exists a large body of images; visuals of no materialized spaces, constructed only on paper or in pixels in popular cultural media – editorial illustration, comic strips and books, cinema, television, advertising and web imagery. All the aforementioned visuals, fragments of architecture are within our everyday life and more important influence strong spatial paradigms for students of architecture. The proposed presentation is about the work within a university Computer Aided Architectural Design studio where students asked to investigate the ephemeral environments that surround their everyday life and translate them into architectural intentions. This paper argues that the digitally mediated design of young students of architecture incorporates the ubiquity of contemporary life-style; reflects through student design proposals the new orientations of contemporary architecture and finally revises the integration of the CAAD studio with the ‘traditional’ studios of design within the school of Architecture.
keywords CAAD and Design Studio Teaching
series eCAADe
email MATTHEOS@UTH.GR
more http://www.design-clinic.com/m.papavasiliou/
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id cf2003_m_079
id cf2003_m_079
authors PETRIC, J., CONTI, G. and UCELLI, G.
year 2003
title Designing within Virtual Worlds
source Digital Design - Research and Practice [Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 1-4020-1210-1] Tainan (Taiwan) 13–15 October 2003, pp. 213-224
summary This paper celebrates the successful outcome of a trial of an innovative multi-platform distributed design decision support system in which the shared design environment exists within the virtual world. The outcome is the result of a sustained three-year research and development effort, within an internationally recognised research group. The project set itself a number of ambitious targets within the broad spectrum of distributed design decision support, viz: • A multi-platform environment: the trial demonstrates inter-operability of different machine platforms - from a home PC to an international standard Virtual Reality Centre. • A distributed environment: the trial demonstrates the high level of understanding amongst the design team separated by time and space. • An ability to propose, discuss and agree upon, design decision from within the virtual world. Hitherto, virtual environments were viewing galleries; designers had to leave them to effect design changes in a conventional CAD package. The trial described in the paper amply demonstrates the potential to design, collaboratively and, in distributed mode, from within the virtual world. The two ideas upon which the system (known as JCAD-VR) is built are: • That all the users present in the virtual world have to be able to share the same virtual environment in a "transparent fashion"; • The user interface, instead of the traditional menu/windows based layout, is part of the virtual world itself. Any element of the interface becomes an object belonging to the 3D world and therefore it is treated as any other object. Each element of the interface can then be moved or scaled according to the user’s needs. The entire project is based on client-server architecture where every user logs into a virtual world and starts sharing design tasks with other users. The authors propose to present a video which demonstrates the positive outcome of the trials to date. More importantly, perhaps, the authors will put the achievements of the R+D into the context of past aspirations and developments in the subject area and, most importantly of all, suggest how these modest achievements will impact on the next decade of increasingly rapid R+D.
keywords collaboration, distributed design, interface, virtual environment
series CAAD Futures
email j.petric@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/22 10:21

_id sigradi2003_038
id sigradi2003_038
authors Pizzi, M., Donoso, M., Caviares, A., Alessandri, J. and Villalón, T.
year 2003
title Incorporación de Tecnologías de Modelado Espacial en un Curso Inicial de Formación de Arquitectos (Introduction of Space Modeling Technologies in an Initial Course of the Education of Architects)
source SIGraDi 2003 - [Proceedings of the 7th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Rosario Argentina 5-7 november 2003
summary The incorporation of virtual technologies to the learning process in architectural design is still incipient, using graphic software mainly as a rendering tool late in the curriculum. This paper presents an experience carried out with first year studio students, at the School of Architecture of the University of Chile, in which the intention is to incorporate virtual learning as part of the process spatial modification thinking. Through the use of Form Z, friendly software to learn for beginners, applied for simple extrusions, geometric transformations as translation, rotation or scaling, and the transformation of geometries and proportions through the handling of topological levels of polygonal objects. Through increasingly complex exercises we developed an effective complement of a traditional design methodology.
series SIGRADI
email Mpizzi@uchile.cl
last changed 2016/03/10 08:57

_id acadia03_032
id acadia03_032
authors Senagala, Mahesh
year 2003
title Digital Theory
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, p. 254
summary The computer has gone from being an isolated box to become part of a gigantic digital network of networks that shapes our collective future. The way and pace at which we connect, communicate, memorize, imagine and control the flows of valuable information have changed forever. There are at least six digital phenomena that directly affect the architectural world: miniaturization (of all that can be shrunk), ubiquity (being everywhere, global), realtime (communing globally in realtime, which is 1/10th of a second), noospherization (networking every-thing), virtuality (all that is solid melts into knowledge), and anamnesia (inability to forget). Temporal contiguity and temporal connectivity have taken precedence over spatial and geographical contiguity. The strands that animate our life today emanate from spatially distant but temporally contiguous/connected places. These phenomena have squeezed, stretched, restructured, reconfigured, and redistributed most major human institutions. Consequently, the built world’s role, importance and nature have changed. Architecture as traditionally understood has become more marginalized than before. Many practices, however, have been repositioning themselves to take advantage of the new opportunities beyond the bounds of traditional architectural practice. Design, practice, fabrication and construction are increasingly becoming networked affairs. The new measures of architecture are connectivity and speed. The architecture of a new world needs to recognize these transformations and think differently.
series ACADIA
email mahesh@mahesh.org
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id caadria2007_263
id caadria2007_263
authors Shaheen, Abeer; H. Elkadi
year 2007
title ICT & Reflective Education in an Environmentally ResponsiveArchitecture Studio
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary The current debate of architecture education in UK Schools of Architecture is reviewed with special emphasis on environmental ingredients of the traditional and progressive curriculum. Environmental approach to design has far more benefits than just informing students of the basics of the ecological and urban settings. Traditionally, UK Schools of Architecture address these issues via required courses (RIBA, 2003) However, environmental forces, wide array of educational innovations and a number of conditions and performance criteria that are set by Royal Institute of British Architects RIBA, for architectural education curriculum are essential drivers that necessitated transforming architectural pedagogy. As a result, new themes are being woven across existing courses, and more attention is being accorded to pedagogical methods of delivery using Information and Communication Technology ICT.
series CAADRIA
email a.shaheen@ulster.ac.uk
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

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