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_id sigradi2006_e171c
id sigradi2006_e171c
authors González Böhme, Luis Felipe and Vargas Cárdenas, Bernardo
year 2006
title Foundations for a Constraint-Based Floor Plan Layout Support in Participatory Planning of Low-Income Housing
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 283-287
summary We introduce the foundations of a novel approach that deals with constraint-based design methods to supporting participatory planning processes of low-income dwellings. We examine the space allocation problem inside the architectural domain on the basis of graph theory and combinatorics, providing a concise mathematical background for an implementation strategy called FLS (Floor plan Layout Support), which is analyzed here for the first time regarding this particular context of application. The philosophy underlying a design method that is mainly driven by the formulation of distinct constraints suggests to avoid the traditional procedure of first to create a yet not necessarily valid instance of the eventual design solution by directly choosing specific parameter values of its shape, and later on to evaluate its validity by confronting the designed model to a set of applicable constraints. Instead, constraint-based design poses a search procedure that operates in a space of planning-relevant constraint sets. The FLS methodology integrates some few principles of constraint-based automated reasoning with high user interactivity, into a design environment where as much dwellers as planners can collaboratively work in solving spatial organization problems of housing projects. The FLS model of application makes use of a combination of dweller-specified constraints, planning and zoning regulations, and a small library of modular space units. Constraint-based design ! methods are particularly capable of supplying efficient support for the collaborative involvement of dwellers into the architectural programming process of her/his own home. Mainly, because dwellers themselves tend to describe their space need and design intentions as a set of constraints on room quantity, space utilization, circulation system, allocation of available furniture, available budget, construction time, and so forth. The goal is to achieve an integrated tool for finding and modelling topologically valid solutions for floor plan layout alternatives, by combining user-driven interactive procedures with automatic search and generative processes. Thus, several design alternatives can be explored in less time and with less effort than using mainstream procedures of architectural practice. A FLS implementation will constitute one system module of a larger integrated system model called Esther. A FLS tool shall interact with other functional modules, like e.g. the BDS (Building Bulk Design Support), which also uses constraint-based design methods. A preliminary procedural model for the FLS was tested on Chile’s official social housing standards (Chilean Building Code – OGUC. Art. 6.4.1) which are very similar to most Latin American housing programs currently in operation.
keywords constraint-based design; floor plan layout; participatory planning; low-income housing; design theory; design proces
series SIGRADI
email bernardo.vargas@bauing.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id ddss2008-02
id ddss2008-02
authors Gonçalves Barros, Ana Paula Borba; Valério Augusto Soares de Medeiros, Paulo Cesar Marques da Silva and Frederico de Holanda
year 2008
title Road hierarchy and speed limits in Brasília/Brazil
source H.J.P. Timmermans, B. de Vries (eds.) 2008, Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, ISBN 978-90-6814-173-3, University of Technology Eindhoven, published on CD
summary This paper aims at exploring the theory of the Social Logic of Space or Space Syntax as a strategy to define parameters of road hierarchy and, if this use is found possible, to establish maximum speeds allowed in the transportation system of Brasília, the capital city of Brazil. Space Syntax – a theory developed by Hillier and Hanson (1984) – incorporates the space topological relationships, considering the city shape and its influence in the distribution of movements within the space. The theory’s axiality method – used in this study – analyses the accessibility to the street network relationships, by means of the system’s integration, one of its explicative variables in terms of copresence, or potential co-existence between the through-passing movements of people and vehicles (Hillier, 1996). One of the most used concepts of Space Syntax in the integration, which represents the potential flow generation in the road axes and is the focus of this paper. It is believed there is a strong correlation between urban space-form configuration and the way flows and movements are distributed in the city, considering nodes articulations and the topological location of segments and streets in the grid (Holanda, 2002; Medeiros, 2006). For urban transportation studies, traffic-related problems are often investigated and simulated by assignment models – well-established in traffic studies. Space Syntax, on the other hand, is a tool with few applications in transport (Barros, 2006; Barros et al, 2007), an area where configurational models are considered to present inconsistencies when used in transportation (cf. Cybis et al, 1996). Although this is true in some cases, it should not be generalized. Therefore, in order to simulate and evaluate Space Syntax for the traffic approach, the city of Brasília was used as a case study. The reason for the choice was the fact the capital of Brazil is a masterpiece of modern urban design and presents a unique urban layout based on an axial grid system considering several express and arterial long roads, each one with 3 to 6 lanes,
keywords Space syntax, road hierarchy
series DDSS
last changed 2008/09/01 15:06

_id acadia06_213
id acadia06_213
authors Guidera, Stan G.
year 2006
title BIM applications in Design Studio An integrative approach Developing Student Skills with Computer Modeling
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 213-227
summary This paper proposes a reductionist approach to the integration of software used in professional practice with course activities associated with design studio. This proscriptive strategy emphasizes the use of task-specific software features to support specific aspects of design project activities and learning outcomes. The rationale of this strategy is discussed followed by case studies that review the application of a reductionist approach to building information modeling software in a third year studio and a design foundation course.
series ACADIA
email guidera@bgnet.bgsu.edu
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id ddss2006-pb-219
id DDSS2006-PB-219
authors Gyosuke Yamaguchi, Takashi Kobayashi, and Yasuo Hibata
year 2006
title The Relationship of Citizens' Participatory Channels in Real and Cyber Meetings through the Planning Process - Case study; the information management planning process in Yamato city, Japan
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Progress in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Eindhoven: Eindhoven University of Technology, ISBN-10: 90-386-1756-9, ISBN-13: 978-90-386-1756-5, p. 219-234
summary In the planning process, Yamato city set up four citizens' participatory channels; two in the real space and the other two in the cyber space. The channels in each space are divided into two types; one restricts membership and the other does not. This paper aims to clarify the functions of these four channels through protocol analysis and draws the following two findings. (1) In the channels with the restricted membership, the theme of the discussion continues between the real space and the cyber space mutually. Consequently, close communication became possible. (2) The other finding is that the continuity of discussions exists almost one-way from the restricted channels to the unrestricted, so the unrestricted channels are regarded as functioning to enhance the validity of the citizen discussions in the member-restricted channels. For closer communication, however, the continuity from the unrestricted to the restricted channels should be ensured, hence it is necessary to establish some systems for the continual communication.
keywords Citizens' participation, Real space, Cyber space, Planning process
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id 2006_074
id 2006_074
authors Gül, Leman Figen and Mary Lou Maher
year 2006
title The Impact of Virtual Environments on Design Collaboration
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 74-83
summary With recent developments in communication and information technology there has been increasing research into the role and the impact of computer media in collaborative design. This paper presents a case study that compares two designers collaborating in three different types of virtual environments with face to face (FTF) collaboration. The aim of the study is to identify similarities and differences between remote locations in order to have a better understanding of the impact of different virtual environments on design collaboration. Our results show that the architects had different designing behaviour depending on the type of external representation: they developed more design concepts, and had more design iterations through analysis-synthesis-evaluation while designing FTF and in a remote sketching environment; while the same architects focused on one design concept and making the design when designing in 3D virtual worlds.
keywords Collaborative design; virtual environments; remote sketching; 3D virtual worlds; face to face collaboration
series eCAADe
email lgul3679@mail.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ijac20064205
id ijac20064205
authors Hadjri, Karim
year 2006
title Experimenting with 3D Digitization of Architectural Physical Models using Laser Scanning Technology
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 4 - no. 2, 67-80
summary This paper assesses the use of 3D Digitization techniques by carrying out laser scanning of typical physical models produced by architecture students. The aim was to examine the product of laser scanning with respect to scanning and 3D modeling processes, and the effects of variables such as characteristics of the models, materials used, and design complexity. In order to assess the similarities and accuracies achieved by the scanning and 3D modeling processes, the research investigated human perception of differences between analogue and digital models. This enabled an assessment of the degree to which digital models were accurate representations of the real ones, and whether laser scanning can successfully be used as a medium to recreate and represent complex architectural physical models. The study presents a potential direction for digital translation in architectural education.
series journal
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id caadria2009_046
id caadria2009_046
authors Haeusler, Matthias Hank
year 2009
title Modulations of Voxel Surfaces Through Emotional Expressions to Generate A Feedback Loop Between Private Mood and Public Image
source Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Yunlin (Taiwan) 22-25 April 2009, pp. 173-182
summary My proposal is an investigation into the perceptual boundaries between human and architectural expression. It asks how architecture can creatively adopt human expression by using the emotions ‘displayed’ on the ‘surface face’ as a generator for displaying a surface on a voxel façade to achieve a cross-connecting perceptual change with modulations through emotion (Massumi, 2006). Through voxel facades the public with their expressed emotions will be included in the decision process of defining space, by expressing our innermost feelings through an architectural medium. Thus emotions of the individual have a platform and can be conveyed indirectly to the public, and in turn open up discussions about the state of the community through the state of the façade. An alliance of media and place in an urban context can be achieved and created, with the participation of its inhabitants, along with a new perception of how media and architecture can together shape and inform spatial relations for a feedback loop between private mood and public image.
keywords Voxel façade; simulation; human-environment interaction; dynamic space
series CAADRIA
email info@clastore.com
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id sigradi2006_e090b
id sigradi2006_e090b
authors Hanna, Sean and Turner, Alasdair
year 2006
title Teaching parametric design in code and construction
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 158-161
summary Automated manufacturing processes with the ability to translate digital models into physical form promise both an increase in the complexity of what can be built, and through rapid prototyping, a possibility to experiment easily with tangible examples of the evolving design. The increasing literacy of designers in computer languages, on the other hand, offers a new range of techniques through which the models themselves might be generated. This paper reviews the results of an integrated parametric modelling and digital manufacturing workshop combining participants with a background in computer programming with those with a background in fabrication. Its aim was both to encourage collaboration in a domain that overlaps both backgrounds, as well as to explore the ways in which the two working methods naturally extend the boundaries of traditional parametric design. The types of projects chosen by the students, the working methods adopted and progress made will be discussed in light of future educational possibilities, and of the future direction of parametric tools themselves. Where standard CAD constructs isolated geometric primitives, parametric models allow the user to set up a hierarchy of relationships, deferring such details as specific dimension and sometimes quantity to a later point. Usually these are captured by a geometric schema. Many such relationships in real design however, can not be defined in terms of geometry alone. Logical operations, environmental effects such as lighting and air flow, the behaviour of people and the dynamic behaviour of materials are all essential design parameters that require other methods of definition, including the algorithm. It has been our position that the skills of the programmer are necessary in the future of design. Bentley’s Generative Components software was used as the primary vehicle for the workshop design projects. Built within the familiar Microstation framework, it enables the construction of a parametric model at a range of different interfaces, from purely graphic through to entirely code based, thus allowing the manipulation of such non-geometric, algorithmic relationships as described above. Two-dimensional laser cutting was the primary fabrication method, allowing for rapid manufacturing, and in some cases iterative physical testing. The two technologies have led in the workshop to working methods that extend the geometric schema: the first, by forcing an explicit understanding of design as procedural, and the second by encouraging physical experimentation and optimisation. The resulting projects have tended to focus on responsiveness to conditions either coded or incorporated into experimental loop. Examples will be discussed. While programming languages and geometry are universal in intent, their constraints on the design process were still notable. The default data structures of computer languages (in particular the rectangular array) replace one schema limitation with another. The indexing of data in this way is conceptually hard-wired into much of our thinking both in CAD and in code. Thankfully this can be overcome with a bit of programming, but the number of projects which have required this suggests that more intuitive, or spatial methods of data access might be developed in the future.
keywords generative design; parametric model; teaching
series SIGRADI
email s.hanna@cs.ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id acadia06_518
id acadia06_518
authors Hasegawa, Toru
year 2006
title The hexEnvelope system: a cross-platform embedding of material and software logic into descriptive geometry
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 518-529
summary This paper follows the technical problematic of the hexEnvelope, a novel system for building complex geometric objects. Operating as a scripted system of parametric operations, and running through multiple 2D, 3D, and fabrication software packages, the hexEnvelope system allows for a highly tectonic assemblage of cellular units. Specific issues addressed within the system include the realization of curved surfaces through flat material, the embedding of fabrication logic and material performance within descriptive geometry, and multiple scales of deployment in terms of their tectonic and material consequence.
series ACADIA
email toru.hasegawa@gmail.com
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id sigradi2006_e081d
id sigradi2006_e081d
authors Hecker, Douglas
year 2006
title Dry-In House: A Mass Customized Affordable House for New Orleans
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 359-362
summary Dry-in house is a mass customized affordable housing system proposed for the reconstruction of New Orleans. The dry-in House gets the owner back to their home site quickly while providing the infrastructure an occupant needs (shelter, water, electricity). The owner is supplied with an inhabitable shell that is customizable before it is fabricated as well as onsite as the project is “fitted out” over time. The key concept is to allow families to participate in the design of their customized homes and to get people back to their home sites as quickly as possible and to give them the opportunity to finish and further customize their home over time. The project addresses inefficiencies and redundancies in emergency housing currently provided by FEMA. Primarily the dry-in House as its name implies provides a timely dried-in space which doubles as a customized infrastructure for the reconstruction of homes and neighborhoods. The project is designed to meet the $59,000 life cycle cost of the presently provided temporary housing, the notorious “FEMA Trailer”. However, the Dry-in House provides a solution that: a) Is permanent rather than temporary. The house will be finished and further customized over time rather than disposed of. b) Reoccupies the owner’s home site rather than a “FEMA ghetto” keeping the community together and functioning. c) Is mass customized rather than mass-standardized allowing the owner to have input on the design of their home. The design is a “starter home” rather than an inflexible and over-determined solution. This also has the benefit of giving variation to the reconstruction of New Orleans as opposed to the monotony of mass-production. d) Allows the owners to further customize their home over time with additional exterior finishes and the subdivision and fit out of the interior. By utilizing plate truss technology and associated parametric modeling software, highly customized trusses can be engineered and fabricated at no additional cost as compared to off-the-shelf trusses. This mass customization technology is employed to create the building section of each individual’s house. The truss is not used in its typical manner, spanning over the house; rather, it is extruded in section to form the house itself (roof, wall, and floor). Dry-in House exploits this building technology to quickly rebuild communities in a sensible manner. It allows for an increased speed of design and construction and most importantly it involves the owner in this process. The process has other benefits like reducing waste not only because it replaces the FEMA trailer which is expensive and disposable but also since the components are prefabricated there is more precision and also quality. The Dry-in House allows the owner-designer to “draw” the section of their new home providing them with a unique design and a sense of belonging and security. The design of the section of the house also provides them with spatial configurations customized relative to site conditions, program etc... Because of the narrow lot configuration of New Orleans, the design maximizes the roof as a source for natural ventilation and light for the interior of the house. In addition, the house is one room deep providing cross ventilation in all rooms minimizing reliance on artificial mechanical systems. The timely and efficient off site fabrication of building sections facilitate larger concentrations of volunteers on site at one time, thereby promoting a greater collective spirit among the community and volunteer workforce, a therapeutic event for the community as they participate in the rebuilding of their homes and city. With individualized building sections arriving on site, the construction process is imagined to be more akin to a barn raising, making possible the drying in of multiple houses in less than one day.
keywords mass customization; digital manufacturing; affordable housing
series SIGRADI
email dhecker@clemson.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id sigradi2006_e145a
id sigradi2006_e145a
authors Heiss, Leah
year 2006
title Empathy over distance: Wearables as tools for augmenting Remote Emotional Connection
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 66-69
summary Mainstream communication modes emphasise network speed, connection access, resolution, portability, and aesthetic design as primary to the success of their products. Within this vision a three by four centimetre screen and high resolution display are deemed adequate to emulate the intensities and complexities of face-to-face connection with loved ones. They allow us to ‘be there with you’ from wherever we might be. Yet interpersonal communication is a massively complex phenomenon. It involves a plethora of micro-activities which occur at a physical, physiological, and psychological level allowing us to recognise at a cellular scale intention, motive and emotional authenticity. Our conscious and non-conscious involvement in spatially collocated communication is substantial due to these myriad channels of real-time bi-directional information transfer. While contemporary communications technologies have the capacity to mediate our relationships, they fall short of encouraging the richness of spatially co-present interaction. The research discussed in this paper investigates the potential expansion of remote connection when electronically enhanced apparel is incorporated into the communications mix. Rather than pursuing the manifold functionalities of traditional communications media the garments discussed focus solely on the goal of enhancing empathy between physically distant individuals. This paper reports on the development and testing of a range of garments that conduct presence information between remotely located people. The garments sense, process, transmit and receive the heartbeat wavelength (ECG). They are enabled with ECG sensors, signal processing equipment, small vibration motors, and radio transceivers which allow users to ‘feel’ the heartbeat of a remote friend/lover/relative as vibration through their garment. The prototypes aim to enrich the remote communications experience through reintroducing an embodied, tactile dimension that is present in face-to-face communication. A range of user testing trials will be discussed which have been undertaken to assess the impact of the garments at a conscious and a non-conscious level. Conscious experiences were gauged through qualitative testing, by way of interviews and unsolicited written reactions, which have provided a range of engaging emotional responses. Non-conscious physiological reactions were assessed by recording ECG throughout user-testing periods. This data has been processed using HRV (heart rate variability) analysis software, running on MatLab. Preliminary results suggest that users have strong conscious and non-conscious reactions to the experience of wearing the prototype garments. The paper will describe the data processing techniques and findings of the user testing trials. The development of biosignal sensing garments has raised a range of issues including: innovative potentials for embedded peripheral awareness media; the expansion of the classical body to incorporate remotely sensed information; the issue of data semantics and the development of intensely personal non-verbal languages; and the issue of corporeal privacy when one’s biological information is exposed for potential download. They also bring into question how our bodily experiences might change when we incorporate remote sensory systems.
keywords Enabled apparel; emotional tools; biosignals
series SIGRADI
email leah.heiss@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id caadria2006_363
id caadria2006_363
authors HSIAO-CHEN YOU, SHANG-CHIA CHIOU, YI-SHIN DENG
year 2006
title DESIGN BY ACTIONS: An Affordance-based Modeling System in Spatial Design
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 363-369
summary From the viewpoint of interaction design, Gibson's affordance concept is interpreted as an emergent action possibility of the physical human-environment-system, which consists of three key components: the user, the environment, and the possible actions. It could help user to perform the suitable action within an artificial environment. This study aims to develop a formal description of affordance in spatial design. Using the formal description as groundwork, an affordance-based modeling system is then proposed to facilitate its further implementation in design and elucidate the new role of users and designers in spatial design. A simplified sink area design is used as an example to illustrate how this affordance-based modeling system works. For users of different conditions, different spatial arrangements in design will affect the performance and users’ behavior as well. This study demonstrates how design by action can be achieved, and then simulates the action sequence of different design solutions to evaluate the system performance.
series CAADRIA
email hcyou@ntit.edu.tw, chiousc@yuntech.edu.tw, ydest@faculty.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id acadia07_040
id acadia07_040
authors Hyde, Rory
year 2007
title Punching Above Your Weight: Digital Design Methods and Organisational Change in Small Practice
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 40-47
summary Expanding bodies of knowledge imply expanding teams to manage this knowledge. Paradoxically, it can be shown that in situations of complexity—which increasingly characterise the production of architecture generally—the small practice or small team could be at an advantage. This is due to the increasingly digital nature of the work undertaken and artefacts produced by practices, enabling production processes to be augmented with digital toolsets and for tight project delivery networks to be forged with other collaborators and consultants (Frazer 2006). Furthermore, as Christensen argues, being small may also be desirable, as innovations are less likely to be developed by large, established companies (Christensen 1997). By working smarter, and managing the complexity of design and construction, not only can the small practice “punch above its weight” and compete with larger practices, this research suggests it is a more appropriate model for practice in the digital age. This paper demonstrates this through the implementation of emerging technologies and strategies including generative and parametric design, digital fabrication, and digital construction. These strategies have been employed on a number of built and un-built case-study projects in a unique collaboration between RMIT University’s SIAL lab and the award-winning design practice BKK Architects.
series ACADIA
email rory@b-k-k.com.au
last changed 2007/10/02 06:11

_id 2006_262
id 2006_262
authors Ibrahim, Magdy
year 2006
title To BIM or not to BIM, This is NOT the Question - How to Implement BIM Solutions in Large Design Firm Environments
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 262-267
summary Building information modeling is the technology that is converting the workplace in design firms. The initial resistance to applying the concept has faded due to many reasons. Professional architects now see the feasibility and benefits of using the new technology. CAD managers in design firms are working toward the implementation of BIM packages in order to eventually, replace the conventional CAD platforms that are still widely used. However, there are still internal obstacles that slow down the process of the implementation. The change in the project management and the required proper training for the conversion are the two major internal obstacles. The current well organized work flow tailored around the conventional CAD platforms has to be changed in a way suitable for the new technology. The training firms provide for their employees should also be re-structured in a more vertical organization in order to guarantee that everyone understands the new concept and the new work flow. Architectural education usually reflects the needs of the work market. It is very important to understand the needs and identify the directions where the architectural education should go. What do we expect from newly graduated architects? How should we shift the focus toward BIM based CAD in design schools? And, what does it mean to teach modeling versus teaching drafting?
keywords Computer Aided Drafting; Building Information Modeling; Architectural Education
series eCAADe
email ibramag@iit.edu
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id caadria2006_151
id caadria2006_151
authors IH-CHENG LAI
year 2006
title AGENT COMMUNICATION FOR ROLE PLAYING IN THE IDEA ASSOCIATION PROCESS
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 151-160
summary This paper proposes a framework for the specification of communication mechanisms that regulates interactions among agents participating in role playing in the idea association process. Since agents process a sort of human-like behavior, our approach is made taking as reference human communication characteristics through using role playing as metaphor. Therefore, we first analyze the characteristics of human communication, deriving role playing for linking ideas in the human world. By integrating with ACL mechanisms, we propose a framework to express communication mechanisms for exchanging message in a multi-agent framework called DIM-2. Finally, the framework is evaluated through an experiment. Also its computational feasibility of a support system for the distributed interactions is discussed in this paper.
series CAADRIA
email ihcheng@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id 2006_014
id 2006_014
authors Iordanova, Ivanka; Lorna Heaton and Manon Guité
year 2006
title Architectural Design Spaces and Interpersonal Communication-Changes in Design Vocabulary and Language Expression
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 14-21
summary This paper addresses communication during the design process and the mutations it may undergo depending on the medium of design. Three experimental observations were held with students in the context of architectural digital design studios. Each of them was performed when the students were working on a design problem, in groups of two or three, with different design mediums: cardboard mock-up or modeling software with one or two mice used for interaction with the computer. The methodology used for analysing the recorded video and graphical data is based on previous research work in the domains of collaborative communication as well as in the domain of design. It combines purely qualitative interpretation with graphical linkographic analysis. A software prototype was developed in order to allow for an interactive category assignment, exploration and interaction. Gesture, verbal language and design space are studied in order to determine their dependence on the medium and the eventual impact this might have either on the design process or on the object being designed.
keywords Design communication; education; gesture
series eCAADe
email ivanka.iordanova@umontreal.ca
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ddss2006-hb-85
id DDSS2006-HB-85
authors J.A.M. Borsboom-van Beurden, R.J.A. van Lammeren, T. Hoogerwerf, and A.A. Bouwman
year 2006
title Linking Land Use Modelling and 3D Visualisation - A mission impossible?
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Innovations in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Springer, ISBN-10: 1-4020-5059-3, ISBN-13: 978-1-4020-5059-6, p. 85-101
summary Additional to the traditional land use maps 3D visualisation could provide valuable information for applications in the field of spatial planning, related to ecological and agricultural policy issues. Maps of future land use do not always reveal the appearance of the physical environment (the perceived landscape) as a result of land use changes. This means that 3D visualisations might shed light on other aspects of changed land use, such as expected differences in height or densities of new volume objects, or the compatibility of these changes with particular characteristics of the landscape or urban built environment. The Land Use Scanner model was applied for the Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency's 'Sustainability Outlook' to explore land use changes, followed by GIS analyses to asses both the development of nature areas and the degree of urbanisation within protected national landscapes. Since it was felt that 3D visualisation could complement the resulting land use maps, the land use model output was coupled to 3D visualisation software in two different ways: 1) through Studio Max software in combination with iconic representation of the concerned land use types and 2) through 3D components of GIS software. However, the use of these techniques on a national scale level for the generation of semi-realistic 3D animations raised a number of conceptual and technical problems. These could be partly ascribed to the particular format and of the Land Use Scanner output. This paper discusses the methods and techniques which have been used to couple the output of the land use model to 3D software, the results of both approaches, and possible solutions for these problems.
keywords Land use models, 3D visualisation, Policy-making
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id 2006_428
id 2006_428
authors Jachna, Timothy; Yasuhiro Santo and Nicole Schadewitz
year 2006
title Deep Space
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 428-435
summary An existing café and multi-functional space at the School of Design of the Hong Kong Polytechnic University has been linked to a “twin” in the form of an online-accessible environment. Using arrays of sensors, displays and other interfaces, channels of communication are established between the virtual space and the physical space, enabling on-site visitors to the café and online visitors to the project website to participate in a shared spatial experience. The project explores ways in which digital technologies can serve to enhance and enrich the experience of spatiality and human social interaction in space(s). The paper explains the design of the modes of communication between the two spaces, outlining the theory and genesis of the project and discussing the issues and principles that come into play in the design an realization of such spaces, such as the interplay between the three-dimensionality of the physical space and the two-dimensional picture-plane based monitor interface through which the website is experienced, and strategies for the transmission of spatial experience within the strictures of commonly-available hardware and software interfaces.
keywords Interactive spaces; collaborative virtual environments; twinned spaces; mixed realities; mediated social interaction
series eCAADe
email sdtim@polyu.edu.hk
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ddss2006-hb-409
id DDSS2006-HB-409
authors Jean-Paul Wetzel, Salim Belblidia, and Jean-Claude Bignon
year 2006
title A Proposal for Morphological Operators to Assist Architectural Design
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) 2006, Innovations in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Dordrecht: Springer, ISBN-10: 1-4020-5059-3, ISBN-13: 978-1-4020-5059-6, p. 409-418
summary In this paper, we make the assumption that a shape modelling process can rely on the application of a set of morphological operators to initial shapes. We refer to several researches which have attempted to identify such operators. We also attempt to validate this design approach through the analysis of some buildings. A design system based on the combination of these operators could enable the designer to quickly explore a great number of spatial solutions.
keywords Morphological operators, Modifiers, Modelling.
series DDSS
last changed 2006/08/29 10:55

_id caadria2006_461
id caadria2006_461
authors JIN YEU TSOU, JIE HE, YUCAI XUE
year 2006
title REMOTE SENSING APPLICATIONS IN MULTIDISCIPLINARY URBAN PLANNING: A Case Study of Qualitative and Quantitative Approaches
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 461-470
summary This paper introduces a methodology of integrating remote sensing environmental investigations in urban greenery and urban heat island effect. It provides scientific planning supporting information through both qualitative and quantitative approaches. A case study demonstrates the implementation in a multidiscipline planning practice.
series CAADRIA
email jinyeutsou@cuhk.edu.hk, hejie@cuhk.edu.hk, xueyucai@cuhk.edu.hk
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

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