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_id ijac20064405
id ijac20064405
authors Calderon, Carlos; Nyman, Karl; Worley, Nicholas
year 2006
title The Architectural Cinematographer: Creating Architectural Experiences in 3D Real-time Environments
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 4 - no. 4, pp. 71-90
summary This paper addresses the problem of creating new navigation paradigms for experiencing architectural designs in 3D real-time environments. The exploration of techniques other than still images or fly-through animations is complex and manifold, and requires the understanding and skills of many disciplines including cinematography, computer programming, architectural design and communication of 3D space. In this article, we present the Architectural Cinematographer (AC), a first step towards new navigation paradigms for real-time interactive virtual environments that are intended to enhance architectural walkthroughs with interactive camera effects. The AC is a fully developed modification (mod) of the game UnrealTournament2004™ using the Unreal™ game engine and relies on the notions of architectural concepts, cinematographic techniques and game level design to structure the virtual environment (VE) content in a way that facilitates a perception of design qualities in virtual architecture. AC addresses the current lack of either software or a structured approach to facilitate this in real-time architectural visualizations.
series journal
more http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/mscp/ijac/2006/00000004/00000004/art00006
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id 2006_860
id 2006_860
authors Duarte, José P. and João Rocha
year 2006
title A Grammar for the Patio Houses of the Medina of Marrakech - Towards a Tool for Housing Design in Islamic Contexts
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 860-866
summary The goal of the research described in this paper is to develop a computational model of the Medina of Marrakech in Morocco. The ultimate goal is to develop a system that could capture some of the characteristics of traditional Muslim cities fabric and use it in contemporary urban planning. Previous papers have proposed the use of three grammars to encode the spatial complexity of the Medina: the urban grammar, the negotiation grammar, and the housing grammar, and addressed the development of the urban grammar. This paper proposes a grammar to describe the formal structure of the houses, the first step in the developments of the remaining two grammars. It describes the set of rules and then illustrates its application in the generation of an existing house. The basic formal structure consists of three concentric rectangular rings with the patio in the middle. The location of the entrance and the staircase are fundamental for the definition of the basic layout.
keywords Shape grammars; housing design; Islamic architecture
series eCAADe
email jduarte@civil.ist.utl.pt
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id sigradi2006_k004
id sigradi2006_k004
authors Dutta Madhu C.
year 2006
title The Myth of Cyberspace: Towards a New Technopolis
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 41-44
summary Professor Madhu C. Dutta has worked professionally as an urban planner and architect and was an Assistant Professor of Architecture at the University of Texas at San Antonio before coming to Wentworth. She teaches a broad range of courses, from design studio and architectural history through digital media and advanced computer applications for architectural design. Some of her most significant works include a city-wide urban riverfront design project in Varanasi, India, and “Solar Sails” a renewable energy design for the U.S. Department of Energy competition (2000) for which she was awarded the second prize among 110 entries. She has presented her scholarly work at conferences in Asia, Europe, Latin America, and the U.S. Her research interests are eclectic; she has recently been exploring the expansion of our notions of architectural space to include hybridized and virtual milieus in the “new frontier” of digital architecture. Professor Dutta is deeply committed to the creative and performing arts as well. She studied and performed Indian classical dance for sixteen years. She holds a BArch from the Manipal Institute of Technology of Mangalore University, and a Master’s in Architecture, specializing in Urban Design, from the University of Texas at Austin.
keywords Technopolis, cyberspace, future, digital society
series SIGRADI
type keynote paper
email duttam@wit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:50

_id cf2011_p027
id cf2011_p027
authors Herssens, Jasmien; Heylighen Ann
year 2011
title A Framework of Haptic Design Parameters for Architects: Sensory Paradox Between Content and Representation
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 685-700.
summary Architects—like other designers—tend to think, know and work in a visual way. In design research, this way of knowing and working is highly valued as paramount to design expertise (Cross 1982, 2006). In case of architecture, however, it is not only a particular strength, but may as well be regarded as a serious weakness. The absence of non-visual features in traditional architectural spatial representations indicates how these are disregarded as important elements in conceiving space (Dischinger 2006). This bias towards vision, and the suppression of other senses—in the way architecture is conceived, taught and critiqued—results in a disappearance of sensory qualities (Pallasmaa 2005). Nevertheless, if architects design with more attention to non visual senses, they are able to contribute to more inclusive environments. Indeed if an environment offers a range of sensory triggers, people with different sensory capacities are able to navigate and enjoy it. Rather than implementing as many sensory triggers as possible, the intention is to make buildings and spaces accessible and enjoyable for more people, in line with the objective of inclusive design (Clarkson et al. 2007), also called Design for All or Universal Design (Ostroff 2001). Within this overall objective, the aim of our study is to develop haptic design parameters that support architects during design in paying more attention to the role of haptics, i.e. the sense of touch, in the built environment by informing them about the haptic implications of their design decisions. In the context of our study, haptic design parameters are defined as variables that can be decided upon by designers throughout the design process, and the value of which determines the haptic characteristics of the resulting design. These characteristics are based on the expertise of people who are congenitally blind, as they are more attentive to non visual information, and of professional caregivers working with them. The parameters do not intend to be prescriptive, nor to impose a particular method. Instead they seek to facilitate a more inclusive design attitude by informing designers and helping them to think differently. As the insights from the empirical studies with people born blind and caregivers have been reported elsewhere (Authors 2010), this paper starts by outlining the haptic design parameters resulting from them. Following the classification of haptics into active, dynamic and passive touch, the built environment unfolds into surfaces that can act as “movement”, “guiding” and/or “rest” plane. Furthermore design techniques are suggested to check the haptic qualities during the design process. Subsequently, the paper reports on a focus group interview/workshop with professional architects to assess the usability of the haptic design parameters for design practice. The architects were then asked to try out the parameters in the context of a concrete design project. The reactions suggest that the participating architects immediately picked up the underlying idea of the parameters, and recognized their relevance in relation to the design project at stake, but that their representation confronts us with a sensory paradox: although the parameters question the impact of the visual in architectural design, they are meant to be used by designers, who are used to think, know and work in a visual way.
keywords blindness, design parameters, haptics, inclusive design, vision
series CAAD Futures
email jherssens@gmail.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id 2006_436
id 2006_436
authors Kaimakamis, Nikolaos and Dimitris Charitos
year 2006
title Computer mediated political communication: An empirical approach towards representing political action in the spatial context of Collaborative Virtual Environments - The rise of a virtual-space dependent public sphere
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 436-443
summary This study focuses on the creation of three-dimensional online spaces, known as Collaborative Virtual Environments (CVEs), where mediated social interaction amongst participants takes place in real time. It attempts to examine whether it is possible for political communication to flourish in such environments, as a case study of the design aspects needed to be taken into account in creating communicating spaces. We entered the collaborative virtual environment “There” as an avatar and monitored the agenda setting of its two major media. The fact that the whole world is designed as an island complex and holiday resort has an impact on the unwillingness of the avatars to talk about world politics, or even deal with the worlds’ political issues in the official media. Our main conclusion is that public sphere as conceived by those who enter a CVE relies heavily on the way that the world itself is designed. This leads to a series of questions concerning the role of architecture in creating virtual spatial contexts for communication.
keywords Collaborative Virtual Environments; political communication; virtual reality; public sphere
series eCAADe
email vedesign@otenet.gr
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_714
id 2006_714
authors Kona, Silika Rahman and Saleh Uddin
year 2006
title Movement in Architecture - An Analytical Approach Towards Organic Characteristics
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 714-719
summary Nature is the fundamental and recurring inspiration of organic architecture. Living organisms, both in their outward forms and in their inner structures, offer endless ideas and concepts for design. Organic architecture works with metamorphosis (the process of growth and change), the notion of “design from within”. Why should architecture be lifeless and static? Here, Movement, a unique quality of living organism is used to contribute to architecture. We cannot make a new life but we can take the characteristics to make changes in our environment, seeking not to imitate nature’s appearance, but instead to imaginatively apply its profound principles. The focus of this paper is to examine and categorize the different kinds of movement that exist in nature, understanding how their purpose can be effectively used in architecture. The topic explores techniques of living organisms used for function and defense and discusses possible implementation in architecture. Movement has the potentiality to introduce flexibility, ecological efficiency and building defense through deformable, transportable, shape shifting and morphing forms.
keywords Organic Characteristics; Movement
series eCAADe
email UddinM@missouri.edu
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_560
id 2006_560
authors Parraga-Botero, Carlos and Carlos Calderon
year 2006
title 3D Real-time design environments for interactive morphogenesis of architectural space
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 560-564
summary In this investigation we are concerned with rethinking and proposing the concept of space towards an enhanced interactive place where our spatial surroundings are no longer understood as fixed but as living organisms that adapt to our inter-actions inside of them. It is the aim of the research to show a space created by the interaction of the users with the building rather than the one generated by the personal interpretation of the designer. A place co-created by its inhabitant in real-time through a virtual prototype. Hereby, we are interested to investigate human-computer interactions inside of game engines as a morphogenetic process for potential architectural design and space conception. This research not only underlines theoretical concepts of architecture and folding as a spatio-structural diagrams that generate emergent processes in architecture design, but also proposes the creation and further development of a prototype based on these potentials that computer games and multimedia have brought to experiment and determine architectural environments. With the potentials of 3D Real-Time engines as design environments for the co-development of user driven spaces and folding as a design formation attitude we aim to determine space within the experience of a space prototype.
keywords Interactive architecture; 3D real-time design environments; Space Folding; User driven spaces; Virtual Collaborative Design
series eCAADe
email caparraga@yahoo.com
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id 2006_724
id 2006_724
authors Pechlivanidou-Liakata, Anastasia; Stelios C. Zerefos; Stamatina Mikrou and Mladen Stamenic
year 2006
title Perception and Cognition in Real and Virtual Computer Generated Architectural Space - An Experimental Approach
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 724-729
summary This paper investigates the difference of spatial perception and cognition between virtual and real architectural environments. Specifically, three different aspects have been studied, concerning the live perception and cognition of a complex actual building, the perception and cognition of a high quality rendered virtual space, as well as the perception and cognition of a non-photorealistic virtual environment. To study the differences between these three types a series of experiments were prepared, in which students of architecture participated and statistical results were drawn. Earlier studies have investigated the desirability of key simulation attributes for architectural design visualization, but extensive research on what contributes to a better spatial comprehension is still missing. This experiment is part of a series of experiments mainly focused on the perception and cognition in virtual spaces. The results of these experiments were correlated with each other, each one leading to new ideas of experimentation. Preliminary results confirm earlier findings from previous similar experiments. It was found that there was a statistically significant tendency of the students towards larger scatter in more luminous virtual space as well as a tendency to visit the lit part of virtual space. Visitors of the photorealistic spaces also seem to have better knowledge of the depth of space in comparison to those navigating in the non photorealistic space.
keywords Perception; Cognition; Virtual Architectural Space; Real-time Navigation
series eCAADe
email deste@central.ntua.gr
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id caadria2006_495
id caadria2006_495
authors R. SATO, W. YEO, A. KAGA, M. OYAMA
year 2006
title NEW METHODS FOR URBAN DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE USING THE VR TECHNIQUE AND ANALYSIS OF THE PSYCHOLOGICAL INFLUENCE
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 495-501
summary Urban plan and architecture require the use of VR systems. We adapted the buildings into a VR system, and then performed a virtual realization in the world’s largest dome at Matsushita Electric Works, Ltd. Walking or flying through life-size space was enabled. We viewed the planned future scenes that featured real size, space composition, and a simulated environment. The construction, the materials and colors of the building were examined. In addition, VR system on PC was applied to city planning and architectural design and a number of novel functions were added to the VR system by plug-in, which assisted and facilitated the design process. The stereoscopic thinking mode in 3-D space can inspire and comprehend more directly the ideas of design, and confirm the intended effects. We accordingly carried out a further study on users operating the VR system to investigate their responses of “like” or “dislike” towards the real time adjustments of design effect at identical viewpoints. Fractals analysis was conducted to demonstrate physically the influence of real time 3-dimentional design and presentation on the psychological trends of subjective judgment. Our findings pave the way for future research on monitoring psychological impacts on observers of VR system during design process.
series CAADRIA
email kaga@mit.eng.osaka-u.ac.jp
last changed 2008/10/28 06:19

_id ijac20064302
id ijac20064302
authors Ribeiro, Fabíola M.; Spitz, Rejane
year 2006
title Archigram's Analogical Approach to Digitality
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 4 - no. 3, 19-32
summary The Archigram Group produced a number of design projects on the subject of computers, either imagining how computers might affect the life of city dwellers, or investigating what changes such machines would bring to architecture. Working with analogical tools and thinking about an abstract digital future, the Archigram architects deployed concepts that would have come to be crucial in recent discussions in architecture based on digital reality. Their research into things digital - without the aid of computers - led them into inquiring about individuality, expendability, interactivity, customisation and even virtualisation. Rendered in some of their design projects we find a number of architectural proposals which offer a new approach towards the relationship between time, space and architecture - an approach which is currently central for contemporary architecture conceived in cyberspace.
series journal
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id ascaad2006_paper14
id ascaad2006_paper14
authors Techel, Florian
year 2006
title Future of Communicating Digital Design in Architecture: overcoming the divisive power of Computer Aided Design
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary A few decades ago architects, engineers and the building industry relied on a set of self-developed tools for drawing and standards for communication within the profession and beyond. Everyone involved in the process of building understood these standards that were developed, controlled and updated by the profession. Today the situation appears more ambiguous. The introduction of Digital Media, and specifically Computer Aided Design, has greatly enhanced the potential for productivity gains. On the other hand, the lack of standardized open file exchange formats in CAD has created communication barriers by making data exchange more confusing and ambiguous. Frequently this has consumed the very productivity gains that were originally envisioned by industry. Problems with proper and fluent data exchange between software applications to no small extent are due to fundamental disagreements between software designers on the proper digital description of a building, leading to nearly insurmountable communication obstacles, designed to potentially divide the profession, practitioners and the educational environment. Consequently construction has not partaken in the productivity gains that other industries have enjoyed. Proprietary file formats and closed software systems have fostered the development of design camps that rally behind one software. Others reluctantly buy into certain “solutions” for they are perceived to be standards. Innovation is hampered as development of industry design tools is no longer controlled by architects, engineers and the construction sector but instead by private software companies frequently pursuing their Based on 20 years of experience with CAD in the profession and academia this paper critically investigates the status quo of CAD in the building industry. It points towards strategies of overcoming the current problematic situation and putting the profession back in control of its own communication process.
series ASCAAD
email techel@sharjah.ac.ae
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id eaea2005_133
id eaea2005_133
authors Weber, Ralf
year 2006
title Urban space and architectural scale - Two examples of empirical research in architectural aesthetics
source Motion, E-Motion and Urban Space [Proceedings of the 7th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN-10: 3-00-019070-8 - ISBN-13: 978-3-00-019070-4], pp. 133-149
summary As one of the oldest schools of architecture in Germany, Dresden has a long and continuous tradition in the field of architectural aesthetics and building composition. Architects such as Fritz Schumacher initiated research and teaching in the field in the 1920s, and this was revitalised during the 1950s by Otto Schubert who laid the foundations for a scientific description of the correlation between optics and architectural design, and also worked towards a comprehensive theory of architectural composition. As a result of the architectural ideology of the East German regime, such studies were consigned to near oblivion and the main concern became interior decoration. With the appointment of Professor Ralf Weber, the institute was reestablished in 1994 under its original name, the Institute of Spatial Design (Raumgestaltung). Its new research agenda originated from Weber’s book “On the Aesthetics of Architectural Form - A Psychological Approach to the Structure and the Order of Perceived Architectural Space” (Ashgate 1994). In order to verify some of the hypotheses advanced in the book empirically, members of the institute have been carrying out a number of studies in the areas of oculomotor research and the perceptual foundations of design, and have been addressing issues that would help formulate principles of good architectural form and space applicable to the everyday practice of architectural design. Currently, the Institute of Spatial Design focuses on the further development of the psychological bases of experiencing architecture, as well as on theories of aesthetics and their application in practice. Specifically, attention is paid, on the one hand, to the perception and experience of architecture, i.e. aesthetics, and on the other, to the assemblage of various parts into an overall whole in a building, city or landscape – in other words, architectural composition. These two aspects are naturally inextricably intertwined: the one concerns the reception of architecture, the other, its production. Under these headings, various other areas of interest, such as architectural tectonics, systems of order and proportions, or the issue of scale in architecture, are tackled through dissertations, research projects and seminars. The institute has been cooperating on several studies with the Cognitive & Biological Psychology Unit at the University of Leipzig and the intention is eventually to establish an interdisciplinary research unit for architectural aesthetics.
series EAEA
type normal paper
email r.weber@mailbox.tu-dresden.de
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id 2006_636
id 2006_636
authors Wierzbicki-Neagu, Madalina and Ram Michael Wierzbicki
year 2006
title Mediated Space and Kinetic Architecture - The Synergy of Co-development
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 636-639
summary This paper intends to explore structured approaches towards the research and development of performative architectural solutions that can fulfill the criteria of ‘mediated space’. Mediated space is intended to engage occupants of its boundaries in a proactive and interactive way. Altering the local microclimate and its physical parameters as well as the dynamic, responsive audiovisual ambience are examples of many imaginable methods of providing the perceptible output layer for mediated space.
keywords mediated space; synergy; kinetic structures; controlling; algorithms
series eCAADe
email madalina@interchange.ubc.ca
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ascaad2006_paper15
id ascaad2006_paper15
authors Anz, Craig and Akel Ismail Kahera
year 2006
title Critical Environmentalism and the Practice of Re-Construction
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary This research focuses on the implications and applications of “critical environmentalism” as a quintessential epistemological framework for urban interventions while implementing digital applications that foster collective, round-table approaches to design. Essentially centering the environment (Umwelt) as an encompassing and interconnecting catalyst between multiple disciplines, philosophies, and modes of inquiry and technologies, the framework reciprocally fosters individual and critical identities associated with particular places, belief systems, and their participants as a primary concern. Critical environmentalism promotes a comprehensive, reciprocally unifying epistemological framework that can significantly inform architectural interventions and the tethered use of its technologies in order to foster increased vitality and a certain coinvested attention to the complexities of the greater domain. Grounding the theory in pedagogical practice, this paper documents an approach to urban design and architectural education, implemented as a case-study and design scenario, where divergent perspectives amalgamate into emergent urban configurations, critically rooted in the conditional partialities of place. Digital technologies are incorporated along with analogical methods as tools to integrate multiple perspectives into a single, working plane. Engaging the above framework, the approach fosters a critical (re)construction and on-going, co-vested regeneration of community and the context of place while attempting to dialogically converge multiple urban conditions and modes-of-thought through the co-application of various digital technologies. Critically understanding complex urban situations involves dialogically analyzing, mapping, and modeling a discursive, categorical structure through a common goal and rationale that seeks dialectic synthesis between divergent constructions while forming mutual, catalyzing impetuses between varying facets. In essence, the integration of varying technologies in conjunction, connected to real world scenarios and a guiding epistemic framework cultivates effective cross-pollination of ideas and modes through communicative and participatory interaction. As such it also provides greater ease in crosschecking between a multitude of divergent modes playing upon urban design and community development. Since current digital technologies aid in data collection and the synthesis of information, varying factors can be more easily and collectively identified, analyzed, and then simultaneously used in subsequent design configurations. It inherently fosters the not fully realized potential to collectively overlay or montage complex patterns and thoughts seamlessly and to thus subsequently merge a multitude of corresponding design configurations simultaneously within an ongoing, usable database. As a result, the pedagogical process reveals richly textured sociocultural fabrics and thus produces distinct amplifications in complexity and attentive management of diverse issues, while also generating significant narratives and themes for fostering creative and integrative solutions. As a model for urban community and social development, critical environmentalism is further supported the integrative use of digital technologies as an effective means and management for essential, communicative interchange of knowledge and thus rapprochement between divergent modes-of-thought, promoting critical, productive interaction with others in the (co)constructive processes of our life-space.
series ASCAAD
email canz@siu.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id acadia06_230
id acadia06_230
authors Anzalone, Phillip
year 2006
title Synthetic Research
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 230-231
summary Synthetic Research insinuates a relationship of a meticulous process of discovering truth contradicted against a fabricated, as in concocted, reality. It is important to recognize the logical aspect of synthetic when examining what synthetic research can provide for architectural discourse. Synthesis contrasts with analysis in that it’s primary methods involve recourse to experience; it is experience that is at the heart of synthetic research. The synthesis of theory, architectural constructions, technological artifacts and computational techniques requires experiencing the results of experimentation. Synthetic digital architecture necessitates a discovery process incorporating creation that allows for experience, be it virtual reality, full-scale prototyping or spatial creations; provided experience is a truthful one, and not disingenuous and thereby slipping into the alternate definition of synthetic.Research’s experimental arm, as opposed to the analytic, relies on tinkering - implying the unfinished, the incomplete, the prototype. Examples of this are everywhere. Computer screenshots are a strikingly literal example of synthetic research when used as a means of experiencing a process. Performance mock-ups of building assemblies are a method of synthetic research in that one experiences a set of defined performances in order to discover and redefine the project. The watchmaker craft is an exercise in research/experimentation where material properties are inherent in function and aesthetics; consider how the components interact with the environment - motion, gravity, space-time, temperature. Efficiency at this point is predominantly structural and physical. Decorative or aesthetic elements are applied or integrated in later iterations along with optimization of performance, marketing and costs.What is a architectural research? How can research synthesize the wide range of possibilities for the trajectory of architecture when engaged in digital and computational techniques? The goals, techniques, documentation and other methods of research production have a place in architecture that must be explored, particularly as it related to computation. As in other fields, we must build a legitimate body of research whereby others can use and expand upon, such that digital architectures evolve in innovative as well as prosperous paths.
series ACADIA
email phil@abc-architects.com
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id ascaad2006_paper25
id ascaad2006_paper25
authors Artopoulos, Giorgos; Stanislav Roudavski and Francois Penz
year 2006
title Adaptive Generative Patterns: design and construction of Prague Biennale pavilion
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary This paper describes an experimental practice-based research project that considered design process, implementation and construction of a pavilion built to be part of the Performative Space section of the International Biennale of Contemporary Art, Prague 2005. The project was conceptualized as a time-bound performative situation with a parasite-like relationship to its host environment. Its design has emerged through an innovative iterative process that utilized digital simulative and procedural techniques and was formed in response to place-specific behavioral challenges. This paper presents the project as an in-depth case-study of digital methods in design, mass customization and unified methods of production. In particular, it considers the use of Voronoi patterns for production of structural elements providing detail on programming and construction techniques in relationship to design aspirations and practical constraints.
series ASCAAD
email fp12@cam.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ascaad2006_paper16
id ascaad2006_paper16
authors Davey, Jon Daniel
year 2006
title Musing Heideggerian Cyberspace
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Where we do we make our “being?” Since our existence [being-there = Dasein] is the original place of intelligibility, fundamental ontology must clarify the conditions of having any understanding which itself belongs to the entity called Dasein. Today Dasein in increasing becoming more and more digital, in fact all activity is digital or becoming digital in one mode or another, it’s ubiquitous! On the pragmatic side corporate architecture as well as its daily interaction and transaction are all digital. With the advent of games as well as webmasters using VRML or some equivalent of it posses the questions and concerns as who will design the digital domains, graphic artists, IT personnel, game developers and where will we make our being? As architects and designers where will our “digital gesamtkunstwerk” be? Making places for human inhabitation in a nonphysical space raises interesting questions concerning presence, authenticity, adaptability, orientation, and suspension of disbelief. What kind of activities can be supported by nonphysical spaces? What will it take to support them in a socially and psychologically appropriate manner? And WHO will design them? On the applied side this ontological view is demonstrated in an Interior Design Corporate Office Design Studio that has been taught for a decade wherein students are required to develop an ECommerce, a business deemed to succeed including the Corporate Office, facility program, space planning, corporate image, interiors, graphics, webpage, and logo. The semester project has one unique design stipulation: The one major design requirement is that the “feel” of the reception has the same “feel” as the website. A phenomenological sameness…all work is accomplished with a plethora of digital media. This design process is still in its infancy.
series ASCAAD
email jdavey@siu.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id 2006_556
id 2006_556
authors Johansson, Troels Degn
year 2006
title Pictorial Genre and Discourse of Future in Digital Visualization of Architecture and Planning
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 556-559
summary This paper seeks to outline a theory of pictorial genre in discourses of future at play in digital visualisation of architecture and planning for communicative purposes. It claims that pictorial genre is crucial to the way we understand depictions of future in architectural and planning communication. Accordingly, professionals dealing with communication matters in architecture and planning should yield for a sufficient awareness of the function of pictorial genre—not least as concerns the adoption of digital technologies for the modelling and presentation of spatial matters. This is urgent since these technologies (primarily Geographic Information Systems, GIS) and software systems for spatial modelling and presentation do not include any aspect of pictorial genre in their current state of development.
keywords Visualization; planning information; pictorial representation; genre; planning
series eCAADe
email tdj@dkds.dk
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ascaad2006_paper12
id ascaad2006_paper12
authors Katodrytis, George
year 2006
title The Autopoiesis and Mimesis of Architecture
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary The use of digital technology in architecture has proven to be more assertive than originally thought: it has reconditioned the nature of the design process, and established new practices and techniques of fabrication. The 21st century began with the technology of art. There is a new responsiveness to the reading and understanding of digital space, which is characterized by complexity and the uncanny. Recent applications in digital technology show inquisitiveness in the contentious subject Genetic Algorithms. This new architectural process is characterized by two main shifts: from poiesis (or poetry) to autopoiesis, and from authenticity to mimesis. Since evolutionary simulations give rise to new forms rather than design them, architects should now be artists and operators of both Inventive and Systematic design. Inventive design: The digital media should bring about poiesis (poetry). Digital spaces reveal and visualize the unconscious desires of urban spaces and bring forth new dreamscapes, mysterious and surreal. This implies a Freudian spatial unconscious, which can be subjected to analysis and interpretation. “Space may be the projection or the extension of the physical apparatus”, Freud noted1. Space is never universal, but subjective. A space would be a result of introjection or projection – which is to say, a product of the thinking and sensing subject as opposed to the universal and stable entity envisaged since the Enlighten. There is a spatial unconscious, susceptible to analysis and interpretation. Systematic Design: Digital media should bring about an autopoiesis. This approach calls into question traditional methods of architectural design – which replace the hierarchical processes of production known as “cause and effect” - and proposes a design process where the architect becomes a constructor of formal systems. Will the evolutionary simulation replace design? Is metric space dead? Is it replaced by the new definition of space, that of topology? The new algorithmic evolutionary conditions give architecture an autopoiesis, similar to biological dynamics. The use of algorithms in design and fabrication has shifted the role of the architect from design to programming. Parametric design has introduced another dimension: that of variation and topological evolution, breaking the authentic into the reused. Architecture now is about topology than typology, variation than authenticity, it is mimetic than original, uncanny and subconscious than merely generic. In a parallel universe, which is both algorithmic and metaphysical, the modeling machine creates a new abstraction, the morphogenesis of the “new hybrid condition”. The emphasis of the exploration is on morphological complexity. Architecture may become – paradoxically - rigorous yet more uncanny and introverted.
series ASCAAD
email gkatodrytis@aus.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ascaad2006_paper27
id ascaad2006_paper27
authors Nubani, Linda N.
year 2006
title Using Space Syntax Software in Explaining Crime
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Space syntax provides methods for analyzing spaces using recent developments in computer programs. This paper reports a study that was undertaken to investigate the role of space syntax in identifying geographical patterns of crime in Ypsilanti, Michigan. All the spaces in the city were analyzed using the Spatialist, a computer program developed by Georgia Tech. The Spatialist computes the accessibility level of all the spaces in a spatial system. Sociodemographic variables such as median income, racial composition, youth concentration and level of education were available from the U.S. Census. The crime report was obtained from the Ypsilanti Police Department and Eastern Michigan University. It includes data on four types of crime at an address level with the exact date and time. Both sociodemographic variables and crime data were merged with the Spatialist map using ArcGIS. The data was analyzed using SAS, an advanced statistical package. Findings showed strong relationships between attributes of space and crime locations.
series ASCAAD
email lnubani@aud.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

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