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_id 2006_674
id 2006_674
authors Bates-Brkljac , Nada
year 2006
title Communicating urban development schemes through architectural representations - an investigation of perceptual responses
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 674-677
summary This paper presents the findings of a research project that investigates peoples’ perceptual responses to different forms of architectural representations as a means of communicating the proposed urban development schemes. By comparing traditional and computer-generated representations, the study aimed to establish whether some methods of architectural representation are perceived as more credible than others. Three concepts were used as the factors operating in credibility assessments, namely: accuracy, realism and abstraction. Analysis revealed significant differences in the assessed perceptions of representations’ accuracy and realism as contrasted with the four different forms of representation. The results relating to the concept of abstraction were chaotic and show highly polarized reactions to abstract representations that collapses the semantic space about a dominant single dimension.
keywords Architectural representations; mediated communication; perceived credibility; architects; professionals
series eCAADe
email Nada.Brkljac@uwe.ac.uk
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ascaad2006_paper13
id ascaad2006_paper13
authors Ambrose, Michael A.
year 2006
title Plan is Dead: to BIM or not to BIM, that is the question
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Drawing, modeling and the explicit abstraction embedded in the traditions and conventions of visual communication through composition and representation are fundamental to the how, why and what of architectural design. BIM presents simulation as an antiabstract means of visual communication that seeks to displace the discreet representation of plan, section and elevation with the intelligent object model. If plan is dead, the implication is that the value of abstraction is dead or dying as well. How can architectural education prepare students for digital practice with such an assault on the underlying role of abstract representation of formal and spatial constructs that constitute architecture? This paper explores a possible path for engaging digital media in education that explores the gap between design theory and digital practice. The investigation centers on ways of exploring architecture by developing teaching methods that reprioritize ways of seeing, thinking and making spatial design. Digital architectural education has great opportunity and risk in how it comes to terms with reconceptualizing design education as the profession struggles to redefine the media and methods of architectural deliverables in the age of BIM.
series ASCAAD
email ambrosem@umd.edu
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id acadia06_232
id acadia06_232
authors Chaisuparasmikul, Pongsak
year 2006
title Bidirectional Interoperability Between CAD and Energy Performance Simulation Through Virtual Model System Framework
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 232-250
summary The paper describes a novel approach involving interoperability, data modeling technology, and application of the building information model (BIM) focused on sustainable architecture. They share relationships and multiple experiences that have existed for years but have never have been proven. This interoperability of building performance simulation maps building information and parametric models with energy simulation models, establishing a seamless link between Computer Aided Design (CAD) and energy performance simulation software. During the last four decades, building designers have utilized information and communication technologies to create environmental representations to communicate spatial concepts or designs and to enhance spaces. Most architectural firms still rely on hand labor, drafted drawings, construction documents, specifications, schedules and work plans in traditional means. 3D modeling has been used primarily as a rendering tool, not as the actual representation of the project.With this innovative digitally exchange technology, architects and building designers can visually analyze dynamic building energy performance in response to changes of climate and building parameters. This software interoperability provides full data exchange bidirectional capabilities, which significantly reduces time and effort in energy simulation and data regeneration. Data mapping and exchange are key requirements for building more powerful energy simulations. An effective data model is the bidirectional nucleus of a well-designed relational database, critical in making good choices in selecting design parameters and in gaining and expanding a comprehensive understanding of existing data flows throughout the simulation process, making data systems for simulation more powerful, which has never been done before. Despite the variety of energy simulation applications in the lifecycle of building design and construction projects, there is a need for a system of data integration to allow seamless sharing and bidirectional reuse of data.
series ACADIA
email pongsak_archenergy@sbcglobal.net
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id cf2011_p027
id cf2011_p027
authors Herssens, Jasmien; Heylighen Ann
year 2011
title A Framework of Haptic Design Parameters for Architects: Sensory Paradox Between Content and Representation
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 685-700.
summary Architects—like other designers—tend to think, know and work in a visual way. In design research, this way of knowing and working is highly valued as paramount to design expertise (Cross 1982, 2006). In case of architecture, however, it is not only a particular strength, but may as well be regarded as a serious weakness. The absence of non-visual features in traditional architectural spatial representations indicates how these are disregarded as important elements in conceiving space (Dischinger 2006). This bias towards vision, and the suppression of other senses—in the way architecture is conceived, taught and critiqued—results in a disappearance of sensory qualities (Pallasmaa 2005). Nevertheless, if architects design with more attention to non visual senses, they are able to contribute to more inclusive environments. Indeed if an environment offers a range of sensory triggers, people with different sensory capacities are able to navigate and enjoy it. Rather than implementing as many sensory triggers as possible, the intention is to make buildings and spaces accessible and enjoyable for more people, in line with the objective of inclusive design (Clarkson et al. 2007), also called Design for All or Universal Design (Ostroff 2001). Within this overall objective, the aim of our study is to develop haptic design parameters that support architects during design in paying more attention to the role of haptics, i.e. the sense of touch, in the built environment by informing them about the haptic implications of their design decisions. In the context of our study, haptic design parameters are defined as variables that can be decided upon by designers throughout the design process, and the value of which determines the haptic characteristics of the resulting design. These characteristics are based on the expertise of people who are congenitally blind, as they are more attentive to non visual information, and of professional caregivers working with them. The parameters do not intend to be prescriptive, nor to impose a particular method. Instead they seek to facilitate a more inclusive design attitude by informing designers and helping them to think differently. As the insights from the empirical studies with people born blind and caregivers have been reported elsewhere (Authors 2010), this paper starts by outlining the haptic design parameters resulting from them. Following the classification of haptics into active, dynamic and passive touch, the built environment unfolds into surfaces that can act as “movement”, “guiding” and/or “rest” plane. Furthermore design techniques are suggested to check the haptic qualities during the design process. Subsequently, the paper reports on a focus group interview/workshop with professional architects to assess the usability of the haptic design parameters for design practice. The architects were then asked to try out the parameters in the context of a concrete design project. The reactions suggest that the participating architects immediately picked up the underlying idea of the parameters, and recognized their relevance in relation to the design project at stake, but that their representation confronts us with a sensory paradox: although the parameters question the impact of the visual in architectural design, they are meant to be used by designers, who are used to think, know and work in a visual way.
keywords blindness, design parameters, haptics, inclusive design, vision
series CAAD Futures
email jherssens@gmail.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id caadria2006_629
id caadria2006_629
authors MICHAEL A. AMBROSE
year 2006
title VERTICALITY AND HORIZONTALITY. FROM THE PANTHEON TO THE PLAYSTATION, SPATIAL EXPERIENCE AND THE HUMAN BODY IN ARCHITECTURE
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 629-631
summary This research seeks to question the assumed relationship between perspectival projection and architecture as means of investigation, representation and ultimately re-presentation of architectural idea and spatial experience. Spatial experience is primarily a product of corporeal sensation. The human body, as the site of experience reveals a conceptual contradiction between our innate senses and learned perceptions (Gibson, 1966). Verticality and horizontality are abstract conceptual and perceptual constructs used simultaneously in human sensory systems to locate one in space and time. The spatial experience as generated from, and translated by, the human body through visual sensory perception is the focus of the work that looks at first, second and third person spatial experience in architecture and architectural representation. As society continues on the path of further cybernetic extension of the body’s sense-image, the context and spatial/visual literacy of the ‘learned’ sense of space-time will continue to evolve, transform and alter as cultures stretch to engage both edges of the physical and virtual worlds. Vitruvius articulated the human experience (and the subsequent expression of architecture) as inherently a vertical one.
series CAADRIA
email ambrosem@umd.edu
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id 2006_560
id 2006_560
authors Parraga-Botero, Carlos and Carlos Calderon
year 2006
title 3D Real-time design environments for interactive morphogenesis of architectural space
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 560-564
summary In this investigation we are concerned with rethinking and proposing the concept of space towards an enhanced interactive place where our spatial surroundings are no longer understood as fixed but as living organisms that adapt to our inter-actions inside of them. It is the aim of the research to show a space created by the interaction of the users with the building rather than the one generated by the personal interpretation of the designer. A place co-created by its inhabitant in real-time through a virtual prototype. Hereby, we are interested to investigate human-computer interactions inside of game engines as a morphogenetic process for potential architectural design and space conception. This research not only underlines theoretical concepts of architecture and folding as a spatio-structural diagrams that generate emergent processes in architecture design, but also proposes the creation and further development of a prototype based on these potentials that computer games and multimedia have brought to experiment and determine architectural environments. With the potentials of 3D Real-Time engines as design environments for the co-development of user driven spaces and folding as a design formation attitude we aim to determine space within the experience of a space prototype.
keywords Interactive architecture; 3D real-time design environments; Space Folding; User driven spaces; Virtual Collaborative Design
series eCAADe
email caparraga@yahoo.com
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id a3c8
id a3c8
authors Verdy Kwee, Dean Bruton, Antony Radford
year 2006
title Visual Expressiveness in Educative Architectural Animations
source Proceedings of the 4th international conference on Computer graphics and interactive techniques in Australasia and Southeast Asia. 2006, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia November 29 - December 02, 2006
summary Consider the current graphic capabilities of multimedia authoring tools. Many information technologies have been exploited to the fullest in the gaming and advertising industries. As far as educational materials produced to explain outstanding architectural and many heritage works, most publications still rely on print media. While much digital information has been propagated online through the Internet (and a few CD-ROM formats could also be found) the techniques of delivery have yet to take advantage of potential technologies, preferring only to digitally replicate and hyperlink the structure and content found in their printed cousins. The reason for this slow adoption is not clear and paradoxical since our society places abundant emphasis and stresses the importance of education over games. However, it seems that the industry and, more importantly, the architecture discipline themselves do not appear to promote architectural visualisations as a significant contributor to the education and learning process. Therefore, educative architectural information visualisation may have to set itself apart, especially to generate growth and interest in this area.

This paper does not deal with the technical aspects of visualisation creation processes but proposes to emphasise architectural visualisations – animations, in particular - as a heightened form of art that could be approached with grammatical lens more than merely a technical exercise that aims to serve an outcome or an industry as they are often perceived now. Digital architectural visualisations and their delivery techniques can be expanded much more as an artistic (architectural) expression like architectural writings are to authors, games to game designers. Although differences could be identified, there are numerous lessons that can be drawn from other forms of art to propel architectural visualisations to a new level beyond those seen in real-estate websites, architectural practices and most students’ works in reputed educational institutions.

Architectural information is peculiar to each building. In order to explicate the essences of architectural works (i.e. the vocabularies, designer’s intents, etc), in all fairness, their presentations cannot be generically produced and uniformly adapted. What one technique and approach could successfully achieve in explaining one building cannot exactly be re-applied to another building with the same expected results. Forms, scales, circulation paths, lighting assignments, designer’s intents, other information (and types) to be delivered differ from one building to another. As such, executions are also wide open to be explored to not only address the practical issues but also to express the intentions of the author/s or director/s to strengthen the architectural narratives.

This paper highlights and illustrates by examples, specifically in architectural flythroughs/animations, considerations that need to be addressed in order that the results would serve as an artistic/architectural expression with a degree of educative substance.

keywords Educative, education, animation, flythrough, expression, grammar, art,
series other
type short paper
email verdy.kwee@adelaide.edu.au
more http://portal.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=1174429.1174461&coll=GUIDE&dl=%23url.coll
last changed 2007/01/03 23:14

_id ascaad2006_paper8
id ascaad2006_paper8
authors Abdullah, Sajid; Ramesh Marasini and Munir Ahmad
year 2006
title An Analysis of the Applications of Rapid Prototyping in Architecture
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary Rapid prototyping (RP) techniques are widely used within the design/manufacturing industry and are well established in manufacturing industry. These digital techniques offer quick and accurate prototypes with relatively low cost when we require exact likeness to a particular scale and detail. 3D modeling of buildings on CAD-systems in the AEC sector is now becoming more popular and becoming widely used practice as the higher efficiency of working with computers is being recognized. However the building of scaled physical representations is still performed manually, which generally requires a high amount of time. Complex post-modernist building forms are more faithfully and easily represented in a solid visualization form, than they could be using traditional model making methods. Using RP within the engineering community has given the users the possibility to communicate and visualize designs with greater ease with the clients and capture any error within the CAD design at an early stage of the project or product lifecycle. In this paper, the application of RP in architecture is reviewed and the possibilities of modeling architectural models are explored. A methodology of developing rapid prototypes with 3D CAD models using methods of solid freeform manufacturing in particular Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) is presented and compared against traditional model making methods. An economical analysis is presented and discussed using a case study and the potential of applying RP techniques to architectural models is discussed.
series ASCAAD
email s.abdullah@tees.ac.uk
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id acadia06_455
id acadia06_455
authors Ambach, Barbara
year 2006
title Eve’s Four Faces interactive surface configurations
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 455-460
summary Eve’s Four Faces consists of a series of digitally animated and interactive surfaces. Their content and structure are derived from a collection of sources outside the conventional boundaries of architectural research, namely psychology and the broader spectrum of arts and culture.The investigation stems from a psychological study documenting the attributes and social relationships of four distinct personality prototypes: the Individuated, the Traditional, the Conflicted, and the Assured (York and John 1992). For the purposes of this investigation, all four prototypes are assumed to be inherent, to certain degrees, in each individual. However, the propensity towards one of the prototypes forms the basis for each individual’s “personality structure.” The attributes, social implications and prospects for habitation have been translated into animations and surfaces operating within A House for Eve’s Four Faces. The presentation illustrates the potential for constructed surfaces to be configured and transformed interactively, responding to the needs and qualities associated with each prototype. The intention is to study the effects of each configuration and how each configuration may be therapeutic in supporting, challenging or altering one’s personality as it oscillates and shifts through the four prototypical conditions.
series ACADIA
email Ambachb@aol.com
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id sigradi2006_e131c
id sigradi2006_e131c
authors Ataman, Osman
year 2006
title Toward New Wall Systems: Lighter, Stronger, Versatile
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 248-253
summary Recent developments in digital technologies and smart materials have created new opportunities and are suggesting significant changes in the way we design and build architecture. Traditionally, however, there has always been a gap between the new technologies and their applications into other areas. Even though, most technological innovations hold the promise to transform the building industry and the architecture within, and although, there have been some limited attempts in this area recently; to date architecture has failed to utilize the vast amount of accumulated technological knowledge and innovations to significantly transform the industry. Consequently, the applications of new technologies to architecture remain remote and inadequate. One of the main reasons of this problem is economical. Architecture is still seen and operated as a sub-service to the Construction industry and it does not seem to be feasible to apply recent innovations in Building Technology area. Another reason lies at the heart of architectural education. Architectural education does not follow technological innovations (Watson 1997), and that “design and technology issues are trivialized by their segregation from one another” (Fernandez 2004). The final reason is practicality and this one is partially related to the previous reasons. The history of architecture is full of visions for revolutionizing building technology, ideas that failed to achieve commercial practicality. Although, there have been some adaptations in this area recently, the improvements in architecture reflect only incremental progress, not the significant discoveries needed to transform the industry. However, architectural innovations and movements have often been generated by the advances of building materials, such as the impact of steel in the last and reinforced concrete in this century. There have been some scattered attempts of the creation of new materials and systems but currently they are mainly used for limited remote applications and mostly for aesthetic purposes. We believe a new architectural material class is needed which will merge digital and material technologies, embedded in architectural spaces and play a significant role in the way we use and experience architecture. As a principle element of architecture, technology has allowed for the wall to become an increasingly dynamic component of the built environment. The traditional connotations and objectives related to the wall are being redefined: static becomes fluid, opaque becomes transparent, barrier becomes filter and boundary becomes borderless. Combining smart materials, intelligent systems, engineering, and art can create a component that does not just support and define but significantly enhances the architectural space. This paper presents an ongoing research project about the development of new class of architectural wall system by incorporating distributed sensors and macroelectronics directly into the building environment. This type of composite, which is a representative example of an even broader class of smart architectural material, has the potential to change the design and function of an architectural structure or living environment. As of today, this kind of composite does not exist. Once completed, this will be the first technology on its own. We believe this study will lay the fundamental groundwork for a new paradigm in surface engineering that may be of considerable significance in architecture, building and construction industry, and materials science.
keywords Digital; Material; Wall; Electronics
series SIGRADI
email oataman@uiuc.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id acadia19_278
id acadia19_278
authors Ca?izares, Galo
year 2019
title Digital Suprematism
source ACADIA 19:UBIQUITY AND AUTONOMY [Proceedings of the 39th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-578-59179-7] (The University of Texas at Austin School of Architecture, Austin, Texas 21-26 October, 2019) pp. 278-287
summary It is widely held that sometime around 2006, the World Wide Web as we knew it mutated into Web 2.0. This colloquial label signaled a shift from an Internet designed for us to an Internet designed by us. Nowhere was this more explicitly stated than in Time Magazine’s 2006 Person of the Year selection: You. More than a decade later, Internet browsers have evolved into ubiquitous interfaces accessible from mobile devices, tablet computers, public kiosks, workstations, laptops, etc. It would, therefore, not be an overstatement to say that the browser is the most widespread content canvas in the world. Designers frequently use web browsers for their ability to exhibit and organize content. They are the sites for portfolios, announcements, magazines, and at times, discussions. But despite its flexibility and rich infrastructure, rarely is the browser used to generate design elements. Thanks to advanced web development languages like JavaScript and open-source code libraries, such as p5.JS, Matter.JS, and Three.JS, browsers now support interactive and spatial content. Typically, these tools are used to generate gimmicks or visual effects, such as the parallax illusion or the infinite scroll. But if we perceive the browser as a timebased picture plane, we can immediately recognize its architectonic potential. This paper puts forth a method for engaging the creative potential of web-based media and Internet browsers. Through example projects, I argue that the Internet browser is a highly complex spatial plane that warrants more architectural analysis and experimentation.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email canizares.1@osu.edu
last changed 2019/12/18 08:03

_id 2006_290
id 2006_290
authors Cenani, Sehnaz and Gulen Cagdas
year 2006
title Shape Grammar of Geometric Islamic Ornaments
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 290-297
summary Shape grammars are the algorithmic systems used to analyze existing designs or create new ones. In spite of using text or symbols to express abstract representations, shape grammars aid to create novel designs through computational effort with shapes and rules. Many probabilities of rule selections and applications of these rules may generate emergent design solutions or create new design objectives. This paper aims to present the characteristics, shape grammar rules and historical background of geometrical ornaments in Islamic culture and to point out the possibilities of mathematics of symmetry. The knowledge presented in this paper can be used to generate new depictions and to gain new application areas like typography, wallpaper, landscape, façade design, tiling, jewelry, and textile designs. Even, these types of shape grammar studies can be used to open a novel approach as in Jean Nouvel’s “Arab World Institute” in Paris. The role of shape grammar analysis of geometrical Islamic ornaments explained in this paper is to increase the efficiency of architectural design education by facilitating the formal understanding of historical patterns. Novel use of shape grammars in education can enrich the designer’s ability to generate original designs. In this paper variants of Islamic ornaments are created with a CAAD program. A selected geometrical bezeme (ornament) from Islamic ornamental design is generated by encoding with a computer programming language. According to the generated bezeme, interaction scenario is as follows: Computer has the main control over grammar application. Only, some of the rules can be selected by the user. Varieties of this ornament are generated randomly through their line weight, line colors, filling types and filling colors. The shape grammar rules outlined in this paper are simple, but the resulting figures can be very inspiring. Furthermore, the endless potential for future design innovations is unlimited.
keywords Computer-generated geometrical design; shape grammar rules; geometrical Islamic ornaments; Islamic patterns
series eCAADe
email sehnazcenani@yahoo.com
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id ascaad2006_paper20
id ascaad2006_paper20
authors Chougui, Ali
year 2006
title The Digital Design Process: reflections on architectural design positions on complexity and CAAD
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary These instructions are intended to guide contributors to the Second Architecture is presently engaged in an impatient search for solutions to critical questions about the nature and the identity of the discipline, and digital technology is a key agent for prevailing innovations in architectural design. The problem of complexity underlies all design problems. With the advent of CAD however, Architect’s ability to truly represent complexity has increased considerably. Another source that provides information about dealing with complexity is architectural theory. As Rowe (1987) states, architectural theory constitutes “a corpus of principles that are agreed upon and therefore worthy of emulation”. Architectural theory often is a mixed reflection on the nature of architectural design, design processes, made in descriptive and prescriptive terms (see Kruft 1985). Complexity is obviously not a new issue in architectural theory. Since it is an inherent characteristic of design problems, it has been dealt with in many different ways throughout history. Contemporary architects incorporate the computer in their design process. They produce architecture that is generated by the use of particle systems, simulation software, animation software, but also the more standard modelling tools. The architects reflect on the impact of the computer in their theories, and display changes in style by using information modelling techniques that have become versatile enough to encompass the complexity of information in the architectural design process. In this way, architectural style and theory can provide directions to further develop CAD. Most notable is the acceptance of complexity as a given fact, not as a phenomenon to oppose in systems of organization, but as a structuring principle to begin with. No matter what information modelling paradigm is used, complex and huge amounts of information need to be processed by designers. A key aspect in the combination of CAD, complexity, and architectural design is the role of the design representation. The way the design is presented and perceived during the design process is instrumental to understanding the design task. More architects are trying to reformulate this working of the representation. The intention of this paper is to present and discuss the current state of the art in architectural design positions on complexity and CAAD, and to reflect in particular on the role of digital design representations in this discussion. We also try to investigate how complexity can be dealt with, by looking at architects, in particular their styles and theories. The way architects use digital media and graphic representations can be informative how units of information can be formed and used in the design process. A case study is a concrete architect’s design processes such as Peter Eisenman Rem Koolhaas, van Berkel, Lynn, and Franke gehry, who embrace complexity and make it a focus point in their design, Rather than viewing it as problematic issue, by using computer as an indispensable instrument in their approaches.
series ASCAAD
email ali_chougui@yahoo.fr
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id eaea2005_000
id eaea2005_000
authors Dechène, Sigrun und Manfred Walz (Eds.)
year 2006
title Motion, E-Motion and Urban Space
source Proceedings of the 7th European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN-10: 3-00-019070-8 - ISBN-13: 978-3-00-019070-4, 260 p.
summary Simulating the development and the image of architecture and urban design means to show how the environment of the future and the living conditions could develop. At the same time it is part of our task to explain our work to local people and to the public and to passion skills in methods, instruments and knowledge in planning to the next generation of architects, planners and last but not least to discuss and to renew them once more for ourselves. Our aim was also to reflect what we have done since starting the look through the key-hole of endoscopy. Meanwhile this look has been completed since the beginnings in 1993 much more by computer and monitor. It is not the question to take the endoscope or the computer as a methodical and instrumental approach. Nowadays we normally decide to take the endoscope and the computer. In preparing the conference and the workshop we thought that this should now also be the moment not only to inform each other and the participants on methods, tools and best practices in simulating and designing the environment but also to focus on the social and human consequences of perception, movement and use the present urban spaces and the urban space in future. So we proposed the theme “MOTION, E-MOTION and URBAN SPACE” and we invited a scientific expert in experimental psychology to give us some serious reflections and one or another hint on our research themes and methods. The contributions and discussions in the conference showed that the proposal has not only been accepted but has also been completed and enriched especially concerning the theme urban space, it’s processes of usage and it‘s atmosphere. Also in the themes of endoscopy and the research on modelling urban spaces and architecture, meanwhile nearly “traditional” ones, remarkable results were presented and discussed. A very important point of contributions and the following discussions was how to present our subjects to the interested public and to improve our own internal exchange. An object could be to enforce the research tasks in researching together even more.
series EAEA
email dechene@fh-dortmund.de
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea
last changed 2008/04/29 18:46

_id c870
id c870
authors Derix, Christian
year 2006
title Approximating Phenomenological Space
source EGICE - Intelligent Computing in Engineering and Architecture
summary Architectural design requires a variety of representations to describe the many expressions a building can be observed through. Commonly, the form and space of a building are represented through the visual abstraction of projective geometry. The medium of geometric representation has become synonymous with architectural space. The introduction of computational design in architecture has not changed our understanding or representation of architectural space, only of its geometric description and production processes. The addition of the computer as a medium should allow us to open new ‘ways of seeing’ since the medium allows for novel descriptions and expressions via data processing hitherto impossible. This paper would like to propose some computational methods that could potentially describe and generate non-geometric but rather phenomenal expressions of architectural space.
keywords neural networks, architectural space, cognition, phenomena
series book
type normal paper
email christian.derix@aedas.com
more http://www.springerlink.com/content/1j54337p42051p84/?MUD=MP
last changed 2012/09/17 19:02

_id 2006_810
id 2006_810
authors Dokonal, Wolfgang and Knight,Michael
year 2006
title Pen or PC? - Is Sketching essential to architectural design?
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 810-817
summary This paper reports on an ongoing student architectural design project that is investigating the differing effects of the use of PC’s or Pens in the design process. We are interested to see whether designing wholly on the computer with a volume modeling software would produce differing results to a traditional design process with a strong basis in 2D sketching. To minimize the influence of the participants previous experience in either the use of PC’s or the pen, we have been working with very young students that have not yet gone through a traditional training on architectural design and CAAD software. This is one of the key aspects of our experimental procedure. We have found that recent software developments in the field of CAAD clearly have and will influence the way architects design and brings the computer as a design tool to the “normal architect”. Until very recently the computer was seen as a design tool almost solely for “computer geeks” in the profession, the majority of architects still using it mainly as a drafting machine or to produce visualizations of their projects after a more ‘conventional’ design process had finished. It is now very clear to us that the ongoing change in technology will have a profound effect on the way all of us will work in future undertaking architectural design. It is an important question for every school of architecture what effect these developments will have on our teaching methods and the curricula. We use the above mentioned ongoing educational project to find out about the benefits and risks of using the computer as a design tool for first year students.
keywords Early Design stages; Collaborative Design; Sketching
series eCAADe
email dokonal@tugraz.at
last changed 2006/08/16 16:54

_id acadia06_304
id acadia06_304
authors Dorta, T., Perez, E.
year 2006
title Immersive Drafted Virtual Reality a new approach for ideation within virtual reality
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 304-316
summary There is a void between design and computer in ideation. Traditional tools like sketching are more appropriate for conceptual design since they can sustain abstraction, ambiguity, and inaccuracy—essentials at the beginning of the design process. Actual graphical user interface approaches, as well as hardware devices, constrain creative thinking. Computer representations and virtual reality are now used for presentation and validation rather than for design. Most virtual reality tools are seen as passive rather than active instruments in this process of ideation. Moreover, virtual reality techniques come from other disciplines and are applied to design without considering the design process itself and the skills designers already possess.This paper proposes and evaluates a new approach for the conceptual design of spaces within virtual reality. Starting from the non-immersive technique we developed before, where the user was able to be inside a 3D modeled space through real sketches, this technique goes one step further, allowing the designer to sketch the space from the inside all in real-time. Using an interactive pen display for sketching and an immersive projective spherical display, designers and colleagues are able to propose and make design decisions from inside the project. The capabilities of the computer to display the virtual environment are, therefore, mixed with the designer’s skills in sketching and understanding the space.
series ACADIA
email tomas.dorta@umontreal.ca
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id acadia06_068
id acadia06_068
authors Elys, John
year 2006
title Digital Ornament
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 68-78
summary Gaming software has a history of fostering development of economical and creative methods to deal with hardware limitations. Traditionally the visual representation of gaming software has been a poor offspring of high-end visualization. In a twist of irony, this paper proposes that game production software leads the way into a new era of physical digital ornament. The toolbox of the rendering engine evolved rapidly between 1974-1985 and it is still today, 20 years later the main component of all visualization programs. The development of the bump map is of particular interest; its evolution into a physical displacement map provides untold opportunities of the appropriation of the 2D image to a physical 3D object.To expose the creative potential of the displacement map, a wide scope of existing displacement usage has been identified: Top2maya is a scientific appropriation, Caruso St John Architects an architectural precedent and Tord Boonje’s use of 2D digital pattern provides us with an artistic production precedent. Current gaming technologies give us an indication of how the resolution of displacement is set to enter an unprecedented level of geometric detail. As modernity was inspired by the machine age, we should be led by current technological advancement and appropriate its usage. It is about a move away from the simplification of structure and form to one that deals with the real possibilities of expanding the dialogue of surface topology. Digital Ornament is a kinetic process rather than static, its intentions lie in returning the choice of bespoke materials back to the Architect, Designer and Artist.
series ACADIA
email elysjohn@hotmail.com
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id a126
id a126
authors Finucane E, Derix C and Coates P
year 2006
title Evolving Urban Structures using Computational Optimisation
source Proceedings of the Generative Arts conference, Milan, 2006
summary This paper investigates the use of computer analogies for naturally inspired optimisation techniques as an aid to developing the site layout and massing for the new World Trade Centre development in Pristina Kosovo, which is being designed and developed by 4M Group architectural company, in conjunction with the Advanced Modelling Group Aedas. The development of a genetic algorithm will incorporate various techniques, that have been developed in the field of multi-objective optimisation, to create three dimensional massing models, and site layout solutions which partially fulfil the Prisina brief requirements, which are taken from specifications created by 4M Group. Genetic algorithms are based on natural evolutionary principles which are explained in this paper. It will incorporate Pareto concepts to manage the optimisation of the various objective functions. For example, these will include volume and position of units, which will ensure that the different and sometime conflicting needs of the site are balanced throughout the optimisation. This type of problem is often known as an NP-complete (non-determinate polynomial time) problem. This will provide architects and planners with a number of Pareto optimised site massing solutions as an aid to the design process. An initial investigation into the specifics of the Pristina site requirements, will be followed by an investigation into the the genetic algorithm which is created in Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) linked with AutoCAD as the graphical output of the code. The embryology (development) of the various solutions from the genetic information incorporates an ‘ant’ pheromone trail model, which simulates the action of ants during food foraging, as a tool for initial route planning within the site. Diffusion and cellular automata are used during the development of the solution to construct the massing for the site.
keywords urban planning, evolutionary algorithms, pareto optimization, Lindenmayer systems, ant-colony optimization, cellular automaton
series other
type normal paper
email christian.derix@aedas.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2012/09/20 16:33

_id sigradi2006_e028c
id sigradi2006_e028c
authors Griffith, Kenfield; Sass, Larry and Michaud, Dennis
year 2006
title A strategy for complex-curved building design:Design structure with Bi-lateral contouring as integrally connected ribs
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 465-469
summary Shapes in designs created by architects such as Gehry Partners (Shelden, 2002), Foster and Partners, and Kohn Peterson and Fox rely on computational processes for rationalizing complex geometry for building construction. Rationalization is the reduction of a complete geometric shape into discrete components. Unfortunately, for many architects the rationalization is limited reducing solid models to surfaces or data on spread sheets for contractors to follow. Rationalized models produced by the firms listed above do not offer strategies for construction or digital fabrication. For the physical production of CAD description an alternative to the rationalized description is needed. This paper examines the coupling of digital rationalization and digital fabrication with physical mockups (Rich, 1989). Our aim is to explore complex relationships found in early and mid stage design phases when digital fabrication is used to produce design outcomes. Results of our investigation will aid architects and engineers in addressing the complications found in the translation of design models embedded with precision to constructible geometries. We present an algorithmically based approach to design rationalization that supports physical production as well as surface production of desktop models. Our approach is an alternative to conventional rapid prototyping that builds objects by assembly of laterally sliced contours from a solid model. We explored an improved product description for rapid manufacture as bilateral contouring for structure and panelling for strength (Kolarevic, 2003). Infrastructure typically found within aerospace, automotive, and shipbuilding industries, bilateral contouring is an organized matrix of horizontal and vertical interlocking ribs evenly distributed along a surface. These structures are monocoque and semi-monocoque assemblies composed of structural ribs and skinning attached by rivets and adhesives. Alternative, bi-lateral contouring discussed is an interlocking matrix of plywood strips having integral joinery for assembly. Unlike traditional methods of building representations through malleable materials for creating tangible objects (Friedman, 2002), this approach constructs with the implication for building life-size solutions. Three algorithms are presented as examples of rationalized design production with physical results. The first algorithm [Figure 1] deconstructs an initial 2D curved form into ribbed slices to be assembled through integral connections constructed as part of the rib solution. The second algorithm [Figure 2] deconstructs curved forms of greater complexity. The algorithm walks along the surface extracting surface information along horizontal and vertical axes saving surface information resulting in a ribbed structure of slight double curvature. The final algorithm [Figure 3] is expressed as plug-in software for Rhino that deconstructs a design to components for assembly as rib structures. The plug-in also translates geometries to a flatten position for 2D fabrication. The software demonstrates the full scope of the research exploration. Studies published by Dodgson argued that innovation technology (IvT) (Dodgson, Gann, Salter, 2004) helped in solving projects like the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, and the Millennium Bridge in London. Similarly, the method discussed in this paper will aid in solving physical production problems with complex building forms. References Bentley, P.J. (Ed.). Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufman Publishers Inc. San Francisco, CA, 1-73 Celani, G, (2004) “From simple to complex: using AutoCAD to build generative design systems” in: L. Caldas and J. Duarte (org.) Implementations issues in generative design systems. First Intl. Conference on Design Computing and Cognition, July 2004 Dodgson M, Gann D.M., Salter A, (2004), “Impact of Innovation Technology on Engineering Problem Solving: Lessons from High Profile Public Projects,” Industrial Dynamics, Innovation and Development, 2004 Dristas, (2004) “Design Operators.” Thesis. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2004 Friedman, M, (2002), Gehry Talks: Architecture + Practice, Universe Publishing, New York, NY, 2002 Kolarevic, B, (2003), Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing, Spon Press, London, UK, 2003 Opas J, Bochnick H, Tuomi J, (1994), “Manufacturability Analysis as a Part of CAD/CAM Integration”, Intelligent Systems in Design and Manufacturing, 261-292 Rudolph S, Alber R, (2002), “An Evolutionary Approach to the Inverse Problem in Rule-Based Design Representations”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 329-350 Rich M, (1989), Digital Mockup, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Reston, VA, 1989 Schön, D., The Reflective Practitioner: How Professional Think in Action. Basic Books. 1983 Shelden, D, (2003), “Digital Surface Representation and the Constructability of Gehry’s Architecture.” Diss. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2003 Smithers T, Conkie A, Doheny J, Logan B, Millington K, (1989), “Design as Intelligent Behaviour: An AI in Design Thesis Programme”, Artificial Intelligence in Design, 293-334 Smithers T, (2002), “Synthesis in Designing”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 3-24 Stiny, G, (1977), “Ice-ray: a note on the generation of Chinese lattice designs” Environmental and Planning B, volume 4, pp. 89-98
keywords Digital fabrication; bilateral contouring; integral connection; complex-curve
series SIGRADI
email kenfield@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

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