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_id sigradi2016_803
id sigradi2016_803
authors Almeida, Marcela Alves de
year 2016
title A teoria da ludificação e os ambientes responsivos [The theory of ludification and responsive environments]
source SIGraDi 2016 [Proceedings of the 20th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-956-7051-86-1] Argentina, Buenos Aires 9 - 11 November 2016, pp.838-843
summary This paper reports the responsive environments and the Theory of Ludification towards the interaction design using the structure of games on feedback process. It presents an interaction classification that can be reactive, responsive and dialogical based on authors related to cybernetics studies. It exposes the need for rationality in environments as an intrinsic and necessary condition for achieving the interaction. It also uses dialogue and game Vilém Flusser’s concepts to support this argument. Thus, it broadens the contemporary architectural discussion that encompassing communication processes that do not recognize the physical boundaries of the buildings.
keywords Resposive Environment; Ludification; Interaction; Play; Game
series other
type normal paper
email marcela@ufsj.edu.br
last changed 2017/06/21 12:51

_id sigradi2013_117
id sigradi2013_117
authors Alves Veloso, Pedro L.; Anja Pratschke
year 2013
title Uma Arqueologia de Diagramas Cibernéticos [An Archaeology of Cybernetic Diagrams]
source SIGraDi 2013 [Proceedings of the 17th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-956-7051-86-1] Chile - Valparaíso 20 - 22 November 2013, pp. 353 - 356
summary This paper investigates the use of explicit structures of information in architectural design. Particularly, it approaches the use of diagrams related to cybernetics and information theory in experimental practices in the 1960’s and 1970’s. It analyses the diagram of cybernetic control proposed by the cybernetician Gordon Pask for the Fun Palace, the diagrams produced by the utopian architect Yona Friedman in the conceptual description of the Flatwriter program and Christopher Alexander’s diagrams and his theories of Synthesis of Form and Pattern Language. Finally it establishes a brief parallel between current domestication and use of dataflow programming with the cybernetic diagrams, highlighting differences in their complexity approach.
keywords Dataflow diagrams; Cybernetics; Complexity
series SIGRADI
email pedroveloso13@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2014_108
id sigradi2014_108
authors Alves, Gilfranco Medeiros; Anja Pratschke
year 2014
title De Uexküll à Pask: a Conversação aplicada à Processos Digitais de Projeto [From Uexküll to Pask: Conversation applied to Didital Design Process]
source SIGraDi 2014 [Proceedings of the 18th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-9974-99-655-7] Uruguay - Montevideo 12 - 14 November 2014, pp. 82-85
summary The paper will present one specific aspect of the PhD research called Cibersemiótica e Processos de Projeto: Metodologia em Revisão, funded by FAPESP, which in turn is linked to the Nomads.usp research group of the University of São Paulo. The paper discusses the relevance of communication and information management in the digital design processes from the synchronic study of concepts such as feedback loop, control and self-regulation. These concepts are present in both biosemiotic and interactive design of functional cycle proposed in 1934 by biologist Jakob von Uexküll, as in cybernetic development proposed by Gordon Pask in his sophisticated Conversation Theory in the early 1970’s.
keywords Biosemiotics; Cybernetics; Cybersemiotics; Conversation Theory; functional cycle;
series SIGRADI
email gilfranco.alves@ufms.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2013_101
id sigradi2013_101
authors Alves, Gilfranco; Anja Pratschke
year 2013
title Processos de Projeto Cibersemióticos: Procedimentos de Observação, Representação e Performance Aplicados ao Design Paramétrico [Cybersemiotic Design Processes: Observation, Representation and Performance Proceedings Applied on Parametric Design]
source SIGraDi 2013 [Proceedings of the 17th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-956-7051-86-1] Chile - Valparaíso 20 - 22 November 2013, pp. 258 - 261
summary The abstract presented here is part of a PhD research in progress, currently developed at USP - University of São Paulo, with the Nomads.usp research group, under the guidance of Professor Anja Pratschke. This research starts from the assumption that Cybersemiotics, initially defined by the Philosopher and Information Scientist Dr. Søren Brier - and therefore gathers concepts of Second Order Cybernetics and Semiotics of Charles Sanders Peirce - while meta-theory designed and developed to promote transdisciplinarity, can bring other perspectives and base updated reflections in order to produce a framework for architectural design processes that make use of digital mediation, especially Parametric Design.
keywords Cybersemiotics; Cybernetics; Peircean semiotics; Performance; Parametric design
series SIGRADI
email gilfranco@sc.usp.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2011_084
id sigradi2011_084
authors Alves, Gilfranco; Pratschke, Anja
year 2011
title Mediação digital e revisão dos processos de design em Arquitetura [Digital mediation and review of design processes in Architecture]
source SIGraDi 2011 [Proceedings of the 15th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Argentina - Santa Fe 16-18 November 2011, pp. 35-38
summary This paper presents partial results of doctoral research entitled Architecture, Semiotics and Second Order Cybernetics: observation, representation and performance in design process. The research is linked to the Nomads.usp research group and proposes a review of design process, considering the mediation of digital media by using concepts of Second order Cybernetics. This work start with the hypothesis that in a contemporary context, professional demands of architects and designers requires a different approach in relation to the concept of emergence in architecture, and also describes an experiment during the AA Visiting School SP 2011, the Strings / Supple Pavilion project.
keywords Design processes; digital media; emergence; performance.; Second-order Cybernetics
series SIGRADI
email gilfranco@sc.usp.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id sigradi2015_10.7
id sigradi2015_10.7
authors Alves, Gilfranco; Trujillo, Juliana
year 2015
title Cybersemiotic Design: a methodological purpose for digital design teaching
source SIGRADI 2015 [Proceedings of the 19th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - vol. 2 - ISBN: 978-85-8039-133-6] Florianópolis, SC, Brasil 23-27 November 2015, pp. 488-492.
summary The paper aims to relate a specific aspect of the proposed methodology for digital design, presented on the PhD research called Cibersemiótica e Processos de Projeto: Metodologia em Revis?o, developed at the University of S?o Paulo (USP), with the didactic experience conducted at the subject Representaç?o e Criaç?o Digital 2, developed at the Architecture and Urbanism Course of the Federal University of Campo Grande (UFMS), Brazil. The paper’s theoretical foundation is based on the cybersemiotic work produced by the Danish philosopher S?ren Brier, which unifies two important conceptual frameworks: the Charles Sanders Peirce’s Semiotics, and the Second Order Cybernetics proposed by Heinz von Foerster.
keywords Education, Design Processes, Parametric Design, Cybersemiotics
series SIGRADI
email gilfranco.alves@ufms.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id lasg_proceedings_2019_fulltext
id lasg_proceedings_2019_fulltext
authors Beesley, Philip [editor]
year 2019
title Living Architecture Systems Group Symposium 2019 Proceedings
source Living Architecture Systems Group Symposium 2019 Proceedings [ISBN 978-1-988366-19-7 (paperback)] Riverside Architectural Press: Toronto, Canada 2019.
summary Abstracts of presentations given by Living Architecture Systems Group (LASG) contributors at the LASG Symposium on March 1 – 3, 2019 in Toronto, Canada.
keywords cybernetics, tavolva, visualization, space architecture, infrastucture, bioregional, 3D scanning, 360 degree, dark, 4DSOUND, theoretical physics, chaos, ceramics, biometrics, participatory art, live matter, agency, biomatter, artificial natures, material, 4D Printing, weaving, craft, botanical fur, bio-hybrids, monarch, wild, nonhuman, synthetic cognition, artificial intelligence, interactive, interface, robotics, manufacturing, tectonic culture
email philip.beesley@uwaterloo.ca
last changed 2019/07/29 12:00

_id 536e
authors Bouman, Ole
year 1997
title RealSpace in QuickTimes: architecture and digitization
source Rotterdam: Nai Publishers
summary Time and space, drastically compressed by the computer, have become interchangeable. Time is compressed in that once everything has been reduced to 'bits' of information, it becomes simultaneously accessible. Space is compressed in that once everything has been reduced to 'bits' of information, it can be conveyed from A to B with the speed of light. As a result of digitization, everything is in the here and now. Before very long, the whole world will be on disk. Salvation is but a modem away. The digitization process is often seen in terms of (information) technology. That is to say, one hears a lot of talk about the digital media, about computer hardware, about the modem, mobile phone, dictaphone, remote control, buzzer, data glove and the cable or satellite links in between. Besides, our heads are spinning from the progress made in the field of software, in which multimedia applications, with their integration of text, image and sound, especially attract our attention. But digitization is not just a question of technology, it also involves a cultural reorganization. The question is not just what the cultural implications of digitization will be, but also why our culture should give rise to digitization in the first place. Culture is not simply a function of technology; the reverse is surely also true. Anyone who thinks about cultural implications, is interested in the effects of the computer. And indeed, those effects are overwhelming, providing enough material for endless speculation. The digital paradigm will entail a new image of humankind and a further dilution of the notion of social perfectibility; it will create new notions of time and space, a new concept of cause and effect and of hierarchy, a different sort of public sphere, a new view of matter, and so on. In the process it will indubitably alter our environment. Offices, shopping centres, dockyards, schools, hospitals, prisons, cultural institutions, even the private domain of the home: all the familiar design types will be up for review. Fascinated, we watch how the new wave accelerates the process of social change. The most popular sport nowadays is 'surfing' - because everyone is keen to display their grasp of dirty realism. But there is another way of looking at it: under what sort of circumstances is the process of digitization actually taking place? What conditions do we provide that enable technology to exert the influence it does? This is a perspective that leaves room for individual and collective responsibility. Technology is not some inevitable process sweeping history along in a dynamics of its own. Rather, it is the result of choices we ourselves make and these choices can be debated in a way that is rarely done at present: digitization thanks to or in spite of human culture, that is the question. In addition to the distinction between culture as the cause or the effect of digitization, there are a number of other distinctions that are accentuated by the computer. The best known and most widely reported is the generation gap. It is certainly stretching things a bit to write off everybody over the age of 35, as sometimes happens, but there is no getting around the fact that for a large group of people digitization simply does not exist. Anyone who has been in the bit business for a few years can't help noticing that mum and dad are living in a different place altogether. (But they, at least, still have a sense of place!) In addition to this, it is gradually becoming clear that the age-old distinction between market and individual interests are still relevant in the digital era. On the one hand, the advance of cybernetics is determined by the laws of the marketplace which this capital-intensive industry must satisfy. Increased efficiency, labour productivity and cost-effectiveness play a leading role. The consumer market is chiefly interested in what is 'marketable': info- and edutainment. On the other hand, an increasing number of people are not prepared to wait for what the market has to offer them. They set to work on their own, appropriate networks and software programs, create their own domains in cyberspace, domains that are free from the principle whereby the computer simply reproduces the old world, only faster and better. Here it is possible to create a different world, one that has never existed before. One, in which the Other finds a place. The computer works out a new paradigm for these creative spirits. In all these distinctions, architecture plays a key role. Owing to its many-sidedness, it excludes nothing and no one in advance. It is faced with the prospect of historic changes yet it has also created the preconditions for a digital culture. It is geared to the future, but has had plenty of experience with eternity. Owing to its status as the most expensive of arts, it is bound hand and foot to the laws of the marketplace. Yet it retains its capacity to provide scope for creativity and innovation, a margin of action that is free from standardization and regulation. The aim of RealSpace in QuickTimes is to show that the discipline of designing buildings, cities and landscapes is not only a exemplary illustration of the digital era but that it also provides scope for both collective and individual activity. It is not just architecture's charter that has been changed by the computer, but also its mandate. RealSpace in QuickTimes consists of an exhibition and an essay.
series other
email oleb@xs4all.nl
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id sigradi2009_831
id sigradi2009_831
authors Cabral Filho, José dos Santos
year 2009
title Do Moderno ao Digital ao Não Moderno: a Relevância da Cibernética de Segunda Ordem para uma Arquitetura Brasileira [From modern to digital to non modern: the relevance of second order cybernetics for a Brazilian architecture]
source SIGraDi 2009 - Proceedings of the 13th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 16-18, 2009
summary Brazilian society is marked by informality, by social plasticity and a predisposition towards game and play. These characteristics are opposed to the perspectival paradigm’s principles, which are the base of modern architecture. Therefore, a modernist practice in Brazil meets an extra level of difficulty because it has to cope with these rather playful aspects. If we consider the second-order cybernetics and its conversation theory, the plasticity that characterizes Brazilian culture may stop being an obstacle and, if coupled with digital technologies, may become the very basis for a truly modern Brazilian architectural practice.
keywords Brazilian modern architecture; second order cybernetics; modernism; Brazil
series SIGRADI
email cabralfilho@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ga0104
id ga0104
authors Caillaud, Bernard
year 2001
title Cellular Automata and Algorithmic Visual Creation
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The cellular automaton concept, a reduced form of automaton concept (specific , in the beginning, to cybernetics and computer science) relates to the notion of local order, dear to Abraham Moles, and refers to the creation of a complex order in a set of cells ( or pixels for digital images) based on a simple law which determine the colorimetric state of each pixelaccording to the colorimetric state of its nearest neighbours. I will examine one-dimensional automata and then two-dimensional ones. I will study theirmorphogenetical properties in the case of neutral values and then of chromatic ones. I will talk about my own creative work, closely related to an "orientated morphogenesis".This latter has its place quite naturally in Generative Art . I will look at paradigmatic explorations,parametric creations, programming perturbations, conditional choices, "chromatisation" and hybridation. To finish, I will describe the last stage of the work which consists, if necessary, of reworking the initial files so as to modify then through "software creation".
series other
email Bernard.Caillaud@info.unicaen.fr
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 88d3
id 88d3
authors Calderon, C., Cavazza., M
year 2001
title REACTIVE VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENTS IN BUILDING DESIGN
source Proceedings: SCI 2001, The Fifth Multi-Conference on Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics, Orlando, Florida, USA, July 22 - 25, 2001. http://www.iiis.org/sci/
summary This paper presents the first prototype of a reconfigurable Virtual Environment (VE). The objective of the system is to link 3D Intelligent Virtual Environments to interactive planning systems. This type of system makes possible interactive solutions where the user refines a possible configuration and enables the system to generate a complete new solution enforcing all the design constraints, previously programmed. In this first prototype we link our constraint solver with the visualization engine so that the solution produced by the constraint solver is displayed in a VE.
keywords Intelligent, Reactive, Virtual Environment, Spatial configuration tasks
series other
type normal paper
email carlos.calderon@ncl.ac.uk
last changed 2005/12/02 10:12

_id 7a20
id 7a20
authors Carrara, G., Fioravanti, A.
year 2002
title SHARED SPACE’ AND ‘PUBLIC SPACE’ DIALECTICS IN COLLABORATIVE ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN.
source Proceedings of Collaborative Decision-Support Systems Focus Symposium, 30th July, 2002; under the auspices of InterSymp-2002, 14° International Conference on Systems Research, Informatics and Cybernetics, 2002, Baden-Baden, pg. 27-44.
summary The present paper describes on-going research on Collaborative Design. The proposed model, the resulting system and its implementation refer mainly to architectural and building design in the modes and forms in which it is carried on in advanced design firms. The model may actually be used effectively also in other environments. The research simultaneously pursues an integrated model of the: a) structure of the networked architectural design process (operators, activities, phases and resources); b) required knowledge (distributed and functional to the operators and the process phases). The article focuses on the first aspect of the model: the relationship that exists among the various ‘actors’ in the design process (according to the STEP-ISO definition, Wix, 1997) during the various stages of its development (McKinney and Fischer, 1998). In Collaborative Design support systems this aspect touches on a number of different problems: database structure, homogeneity of the knowledge bases, the creation of knowledge bases (Galle, 1995), the representation of the IT datum (Carrara et al., 1994; Pohl and Myers, 1994; Papamichael et al., 1996; Rosenmann and Gero, 1996; Eastman et al., 1997; Eastman, 1998; Kim, et al., 1997; Kavakli, 2001). Decision-making support and the relationship between ‘private’ design space (involving the decisions of the individual design team) and the ‘shared’ design space (involving the decisions of all the design teams, Zang and Norman, 1994) are the specific topic of the present article.

Decisions taken in the ‘private design space’ of the design team or ‘actor’ are closely related to the type of support that can be provided by a Collaborative Design system: automatic checks performed by activating procedures and methods, reporting of 'local' conflicts, methods and knowledge for the resolution of ‘local’ conflicts, creation of new IT objects/ building components, who the objects must refer to (the ‘owner’), 'situated' aspects (Gero and Reffat, 2001) of the IT objects/building components.

Decisions taken in the ‘shared design space’ involve aspects that are typical of networked design and that are partially present in the ‘private’ design space. Cross-checking, reporting of ‘global’ conflicts to all those concerned, even those who are unaware they are concerned, methods for their resolution, the modification of data structure and interface according to the actors interacting with it and the design phase, the definition of a 'dominus' for every IT object (i.e. the decision-maker, according to the design phase and the creation of the object). All this is made possible both by the model for representing the building (Carrara and Fioravanti, 2001), and by the type of IT representation of the individual building components, using the methods and techniques of Knowledge Engineering through a structured set of Knowledge Bases, Inference Engines and Databases. The aim is to develop suitable tools for supporting integrated Process/Product design activity by means of a effective and innovative representation of building entities (technical components, constraints, methods) in order to manage and resolve conflicts generated during the design activity.

keywords Collaborative Design, Architectural Design, Distributed Knowledge Bases, ‘Situated’ Object, Process/Product Model, Private/Shared ‘Design Space’, Conflict Reduction.
series other
type symposium
email antonio.fioravanti@uniroma1.it
last changed 2005/03/30 14:25

_id 6279
id 6279
authors Carrara, G.; Fioravanti, A.
year 2002
title Private Space' and ‘Shared Space’ Dialectics in Collaborative Architectural Design
source InterSymp 2002 - 14th International Conference on Systems Research, Informatics and Cybernetics (July 29 - August 3, 2002), pp 28-44.
summary The present paper describes on-going research on Collaborative Design. The proposed model, the resulting system and its implementation refer mainly to architectural and building design in the modes and forms in which it is carried on in advanced design firms. The model may actually be used effectively also in other environments. The research simultaneously pursues an integrated model of the: a) structure of the networked architectural design process (operators, activities, phases and resources); b) required knowledge (distributed and functional to the operators and the process phases). The article focuses on the first aspect of the model: the relationship that exists among the various ‘actors’ in the design process (according to the STEP-ISO definition, Wix, 1997) during the various stages of its development (McKinney and Fischer, 1998). In Collaborative Design support systems this aspect touches on a number of different problems: database structure, homogeneity of the knowledge bases, the creation of knowledge bases (Galle, 1995), the representation of the IT datum (Carrara et al., 1994; Pohl and Myers, 1994; Papamichael et al., 1996; Rosenmann and Gero, 1996; Eastman et al., 1997; Eastman, 1998; Kim, et al., 1997; Kavakli, 2001). Decision-making support and the relationship between ‘private’ design space (involving the decisions of the individual design team) and the ‘shared’ design space (involving the decisions of all the design teams, Zang and Norman, 1994) are the specific topic of the present article.

Decisions taken in the ‘private design space’ of the design team or ‘actor’ are closely related to the type of support that can be provided by a Collaborative Design system: automatic checks performed by activating procedures and methods, reporting of 'local' conflicts, methods and knowledge for the resolution of ‘local’ conflicts, creation of new IT objects/ building components, who the objects must refer to (the ‘owner’), 'situated' aspects (Gero and Reffat, 2001) of the IT objects/building components.

Decisions taken in the ‘shared design space’ involve aspects that are typical of networked design and that are partially present in the ‘private’ design space. Cross-checking, reporting of ‘global’ conflicts to all those concerned, even those who are unaware they are concerned, methods for their resolution, the modification of data structure and interface according to the actors interacting with it and the design phase, the definition of a 'dominus' for every IT object (i.e. the decision-maker, according to the design phase and the creation of the object). All this is made possible both by the model for representing the building (Carrara and Fioravanti, 2001), and by the type of IT representation of the individual building components, using the methods and techniques of Knowledge Engineering through a structured set of Knowledge Bases, Inference Engines and Databases. The aim is to develop suitable tools for supporting integrated Process/Product design activity by means of a effective and innovative representation of building entities (technical components, constraints, methods) in order to manage and resolve conflicts generated during the design activity.

keywords Collaborative Design, Architectural Design, Distributed Knowledge Bases, ‘Situated’ Object, Process/Product Model, Private/Shared ‘Design Space’, Conflict Reduction.
series other
type symposium
email antonio.fioravanti@uniroma1.it
last changed 2012/12/04 06:53

_id 6ee1
authors Christiansson, Per
year 1990
title Background Agents to Enhance Access and Growth of Loosely Coupled Models for Building Design
source System Research, Informatics and Cybernetics, International Conference -- ICSRIC-90. (5th. : 1990 : Baden-Baden, Germany). 6 p. : ill. includes bibliography
summary The paper describes and exemplifies how modern information technology may impact the properties of future building information systems. Examples have been picked from ongoing research under the heading KBS-MEDIA LAB, Knowledge based systems media lab
keywords AI, user interface, knowledge, representation, hypermedia,
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:07

_id ijac201614102
id ijac201614102
authors Cifuentes Quin, Camilo Andre?s
year 2016
title The cybernetic imagination of computational architecture
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 14 - no. 1, 16-29
summary Since the publication in 1948 of Norbert Wiener’s Cybernetics, this thought model has exerted a profound influence in contemporary knowledge. Such influence has been decisive for a paradigm shift in the profession of architecture and particularly for the rise of a computational perspective in architectural design. This article explores the link between the cybernetic paradigm and the conception of architectural objects as performative, responsive, intelligent, and sentient artifacts—the visions of buildings that have been central to the development of digital architecture since its early stages. This connection shows that the dominant visions of design problems associated with the development of a computational perspective in architecture have not been exclusively the result of the introduction of computer pragmatics in architectural design. On the contrary, following such scholars as Bruno Latour and Katherine Hayles, these developments must be considered as the result of a particular feedback process that includes technical aspects as well as the definition of design problems around an informational ontology and epistemology. The understanding of the intellectual foundations of digital architecture is crucial not only to promote a critical regard of its productions but to imagine scenarios for a viable cybernetic practice of computer-mediated architectural design.
keywords Architecture, cybernetics, computational design
series journal
last changed 2016/06/13 06:34

_id ecaadesigradi2019_081
id ecaadesigradi2019_081
authors Costa, Phillipe
year 2019
title Grey Box City - Building cybernetic urban systems for smarter simulations
source Sousa, JP, Xavier, JP and Castro Henriques, G (eds.), Architecture in the Age of the 4th Industrial Revolution - Proceedings of the 37th eCAADe and 23rd SIGraDi Conference - Volume 1, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal, 11-13 September 2019, pp. 767-774
summary In this paper we approach the concept of grey box model to understand the subjectivity and objectivity of urban design. From the beginning of the insertion of computational systems in the systems management, we understand that some simulations and the understanding of the city itself were partial: we do not understand the city and its spatial complexity and we have the pretension to do urban design thinking that we understand the urban life . Here we will address some categories of how we can simulate and create our urban systems using a more tactile cybernetics.
keywords Grey Box; Cybernetics; Smart City; Information Technology
series eCAADeSIGraDi
email phillipe.arquitetura@gmail.com
last changed 2019/08/26 20:26

_id caadria2008_62_session6a_510
id caadria2008_62_session6a_510
authors Diniz, Nancy
year 2008
title Body tailored space: Configuring Space through Embodiment
source CAADRIA 2008 [Proceedings of the 13th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Chiang Mai (Thailand) 9-12 April 2008, pp. 510-517
summary With this project I propose that embodiment can be more emphasized and better supported in space-design frameworks. This paper presents background on several theories of embodiment since the beginning of the twentieth century to recent developments of the concept in tangible and social computing and anticipate that this reveals pathways for designing new embodiment framework systems for architecture. I suggest that architecture and interactive computing can share a common theoretical foundation in embodied interaction. The main thesis is for designers to use the body as an interface to understand how the interaction between a person and his/her surroundings arises and how our embodiment reveals other rich spatial qualities during the conception phase of design. This paper proposes a conceptual framework for embodied interaction based on the creation of real-time systems in order to instigate a framework for interactive processes that can help designers understand architecture phenomena and the performance of space. I present a design experiment on embodied performance space entitled “Body Tailored Space” where the boundaries of the human body are metaphorically extended into surrounding membranes.
keywords Embodiment; embodied interaction; interactive architecture; phenomenology; second order cybernetics
series CAADRIA
email n.diniz@ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id acadia11_318
id acadia11_318
authors Doumpioti,Christina
year 2011
title Responsive and Autonomous Material Interfaces
source ACADIA 11: Integration through Computation [Proceedings of the 31st Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA)] [ISBN 978-1-6136-4595-6] Banff (Alberta) 13-16 October, 2011, pp. 318-325
summary This paper presents continuing research on responsive systems in architecture; the ability of architectural systems to change certain properties in response to their surrounding environmental pressures. While doing so, it shifts from current and past examples of mechanical approaches of adaptation, towards biological paradigms of seamless material integration. Looking at biological mechanisms of growth and focusing on the material make-up behind them, the research proposes the exploration of material systems in a two-fold interrelated manner: firstly, through passive material systems of variable elasticity, and secondly through the embedment of smart materials with shape-changing properties. The combination of the two is aiming at architectural systems of functional versatility.Through an interdisciplinary approach, the paper examines the following questions: Is it possible to envisage structures that share the principles of adaptation and response of living organisms? What are the technological challenges faced when designing self-actuated responsive interfaces? Which is the conceptual framework for understanding and investigating complex adaptive and responsive systems? By exploring and synthesizing theories and tools from material science, bioengineering and cybernetics the aim is to inform architectural interfaces able to enhance interconnectivity between the man-made and the natural. Focusing on the self-organization of material systems the intention is to suggest architectural interventions, which become sub-systems of their ecological milieu. The emphasis therefore is placed not on architectural formalism, but on how we can define synthetic environments through constant exchanges of energy, matter and information.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email doumpic@hotmail.com
last changed 2011/10/06 04:05

_id 46d4
id 46d4
authors Fischer, Thomas
year 2008
title Designing (tools (for designing (tools for ...))))
source RMIT University, Melbourne
summary Outcomes of innovative designing are frequently described as enabling us in achieving more desirable futures. How can we design and innovate so as to enable future processes of design and innovation? To investigate this question, this thesis probes the conditions, possibilities and limitations of toolmaking for novelty and knowledge generation, or in other words, it examines designing for designing. The focus of this thesis is on the development of digital design tools that support the reconciliation of conflicting criteria centred on architectural geometry. Of particular interest are the roles of methodological approaches and of biological analogies as guides in toolmaking for design, as well as the possibility of generalising design tools beyond the contexts from which they originate. The presented investigation consists of an applied toolmaking study and a subsequent reflective analysis using second- order cybernetics as a theoretical framework. Observations made during the toolmaking study suggest that biological analogies can, in informal ways, inspire designing, including the designing of design tools. Design tools seem to enable the generation of novelty and knowledge beyond the contexts in and for which they are developed only if their users apply them in ways unanticipated by the toolmaker. Abstract The reflective analysis offers theoretical explanations for these observations based on aspects of second-order cybernetics. These aspects include the modelling of designing as a conversation, different relationships between observers (such as designers) and systems (such as designers engaged in their projects), the distinction between coded and uncoded knowledge, as well as processes underlying the production and the restriction of meaning. Initially aimed at the development of generally applicable, prescriptive digital tools for designing, the presented work results in a personal descriptive model of novelty and knowledge generation in science and design. This shift indicates a perspective change from a positivist to a relativist outlook on designing, which was accomplished over the course of the study. Investigating theory and practice of designing and of science, this study establishes an epistemological model of designing that accommodates and extends a number of theoretical concepts others have previously proposed. According to this model, both design and science generate and encode new knowledge through conversational processes, in which open-minded perception appears to be of greater innovative power than efforts to exercise control. The presented work substantiates and exemplifies radical constructivist theory of knowledge and novelty production, establishes correspondences between systems theory and design research theory and implies that mainstream scientific theories and practices are insufficient to account for and to guide innovation.
keywords Digital design tools, geometry rationalisation, second-order cybernetics, knowledge generation
series thesis:PhD
type normal paper
email sdtom@polyu.edu.hk
more http://adt.lib.rmit.edu.au/adt/public/adt-VIT20080424.160537/index.html
last changed 2008/05/10 06:31

_id a4d9
authors Foerster, H.
year 1973
title On Constructing a Reality
source Preiser, F, Environmental Design Research Stroudberg. Dowden, Hutchinson and Ross
summary I first met Heinz von Foerster on a visit to his home at One Eden West Rd. near Pescadero, California, in the fall of 1997. I was in the company of Frank Galuzska, my professor at the time, and two other students - the four of us constituting an experimental course in design theory at the University of California, Santa Cruz that was my introduction to cybernetics and design. As part of that course, Frank had assigned "On Constructing A Reality" and I was eager to make my acquaintance with the man behind those words.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

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